Get SF Weekly Newsletters
Pin It

Reel World 

Wednesday, Dec 16 1998
Comments
Special Advance Screening!
Reel World hasn't got time for Top 10 lists and lengthy backward-looking, year-in-review entertainment features. Instead, we present our predictions for 1999.

Here's what you can expect in the Bay Area movie scene in the next 12 months:

JANUARY: After nearly five months without a lead film critic, the Examiner finally fills the job vacated by Barbara Shulgasser. Ten minutes later, the Examiner buys the Chronicle and cans Mick LaSalle, Edward Guthmann, and the Little Man. The paper is inundated with angry letters from Orinda. ... The Regency II closes, with no fanfare. ...

FEBRUARY: The rare Bob Dylan documentary Eat the Document plays at the Roxie for two days. In a radical ploy, the theater reduces ticket prices to $4 for the one-hour film, which plays eight shows daily to jampacked houses. ... Roberto Benigni buys a house in Mill Valley. ...

MARCH: Bay Guardian film critic Chuck Stephens' feature debut, a 10th anniversary shot-by-shot remake of Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure, plays a week at the Lumiere. ... The Roxie II, an 80-seat room a few doors west of the big house on 16th Street, opens its doors with a Sunday night Oscar party co-sponsored by the Cannabis Buyers' Club. Saving Private Ryan collects eight Oscars, including best picture and sound. ...

APRIL: The Sony Metreon entertainment complex opens at Yerba Buena Center with 15 screens and an IMAX. ... The S.F. International Film Festival bestows the Akira Kurosawa Award for lifetime achievement on Japanese director Shohei Imamura. A highlight of the festival is a 50th anniversary screening of John Ford's She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. ... At the L.A. premiere of Renegade Blade, the film debut of Kentaro Seagal, the Tommy Hilfiger model and son of Steven gives the Dalai Lama a pair of designer shades. ...

MAY: Star Wars: The Phantom Menace opens on a record 2,900 screens and grosses a record $65 million the first weekend. Every other theater in the country offers a combination of vaudeville and Bob Hope movies. ... John Singleton buys a house in Mill Valley. ...

JUNE: Philip Kaufman begins production on The Runaway Jury, the North Beach filmmaker's first movie since Rising Sun. Johnny Depp plays an ambitious, morally conflicted lawyer.

JULY: Y2K anxiety is credited with the overflow crowds that descend on the Castro for the one-day Silent Film Festival. ... Roberto Benigni checks into the Betty Ford Clinic. ... Parker Posey buys a house in Mill Valley. ...

AUGUST: The Vogue Theater closes, with no fanfare. ... At long last, Terry Zwigoff (Crumb) rolls camera on his first narrative feature, Ghost World, starring Christina Ricci and based on cartoonist Daniel Clowes' screenplay. ...

SEPTEMBER: Gus Van Sant's 30th anniversary shot-by-shot remake of Easy Rider, starring Ben Affleck and Matt Damon, is applauded by the Examiner for its "lyrical but subtle homoeroticism." ...

OCTOBER: Kidnapped by his chauffeur, Mayor Willie Brown sees The Ten Commandments at Oakland's Paramount Theater. Inspired by the Paramount's majesty and Moses' close rapport with God, Brown orchestrates a deal among the Nasser family, Blumenfeld Theaters, Robin Williams, and the S.F. Redevelopment Agency to refurbish and restore the Castro Theater to its original luminosity. ...

NOVEMBER: Monkey Bone, the latest stop-motion animated feature from Bay Area wizard Henry Selick (Nightmare Before Christmas), opens. ... Will Smith buys a house in Mill Valley. ...

DECEMBER: The biggest holiday film is Clint Eastwood's 50th anniversary shot-by-shot remake of Sam Fuller's I Shot Jesse James. ... The Examiner declares that Leonardo DiCaprio's career is over.

By Michael Fox
foxonfilm@aol.com

About The Author

Michael Fox

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Slideshows

Popular Stories

  1. Most Popular Stories
  2. Stories You Missed