Skits and Skin

Is it getting hot in here?

WED 6/25

Nothing makes an evening more tantalizing than a legendary venue, a bevy of bodacious babes, and some good old-fashioned bawdy burlesque. The venue in question is the timeless Bimbo's 365 Club, the babes are definitely bountiful, and the burlesque is courtesy of the BurlesqueFest, on the last stop of its nationwide tour.

The gals have gyrated in Georgia, flirted in Philly, mixed it up in Minnesota (don't even thinkof saying they'll be getting frisky in Frisco), and now the BurlesqueFest brings its newfangled "neo-burlesque" movement to our lovely hamlet. Sure, the burlesque revival has been making eyeglasses steam up for years, but this troupe claims to be the first treasure trove of tease to take its act to the people all across our lady-lovin' land.

Aaron Farmer
We're Desperate: The Punk 
Rock 
Photography of Jim Jocoy, SF/LA 
78-80.
We're Desperate: The Punk Rock Photography of Jim Jocoy, SF/LA 78-80.
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."
"Philip Guston Retrospective."

Full of sass, seduction, and style, this collection of nostalgic acts -- complete with comedy, music, skits, and skin -- should titillate even the most hardened of hipsters. Starring in the extravaganza are Catherine D'Lish, premier fan dancer, and Miss Kitty Crimson, our modern answer to Mae West, along with other captivating flights of fancy and flirtation. Get your va-va-va-voom at 8 p.m. at Bimbo's, 1025 Columbus (at Chestnut), S.F. Admission is $20-22; call 474-0365 or visit www.burlesquefest.com.
-- Sunny Andersen

Love Conquers All
A Mexican filmmaker's debut

MON 6/30

Mexican director Carlos Reygadas' Japón isn't exactly about Japan. In the movie, a middle-aged man leaves Mexico City for the lonely vastness of the Sierra Tarahumara canyon, on a mission to kill himself. When he arrives, he rents a room from an old, religious woman and prepares for his final days among the local indigenous people. But he unexpectedly falls in love with his landlady, and his intense reverence for her shifts his perspective.

Shot mostly in 16mm, scored with Bach and Arvo Pärt compositions, and employing only nonprofessionals, Reygadas' first film is an aching meditation on life and nature. But why "Japón"? Perhaps a closer look at the film's themes -- suicide, warriors, and rebirth -- might shed some light. See it at the Castro Theatre starting Monday, 429 Castro (near Market), S.F. Admission is $5-8; call 621-6120 or visit www.castrotheatre.com for show times.
-- Karen Macklin

What a Punk
DIY style in print

DAILY 6/25-8/19

Jim Jocoyfell in love with the punk rock lifestyle after attending a Ramones concert in 1977, which meant he spent a lot of time hanging out in S.F.'s seminal club, Mabuhay Gardens, scoping out scenesters dressed in leopard prints, leather jackets, and eyeliner. The fledgling lensman caught such legendary icons as Iggy Pop, Lydia Lunch, and Sid Vicious on film, as he chronicled the emergence of the subculture here and in L.A. Many of the never-before-seen pictures, which are collected in Jocoy's first monograph, We're Desperate: The Punk Rock Photography of Jim Jocoy, SF/LA 78-80, are on display through Aug. 19 at Aquarius Records, 1055 Valencia, S.F. Admission is free; call 647-2272.
-- Lisa Hom

Cartoon Art

SAT-TUES 6/28-7/1

The sinister, cartoonlike images of hooded figures that painter Philip Guston became most famous for in the 1970s were just a phase in his artistic development. Before those startling forms, he dabbled in the figurative style, abstract expressionism, and, later in life, still lifes and landscapes, all of which appear in "Philip Guston Retrospective," a comprehensive survey running through Sept. 28 at SFMOMA, 151 Third St., S.F. Admission is free-$10; call 357-4000.
-- Lisa Hom

 
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