Do Ants Farm?

An art collective's films on DVD

TUES 3/16

You may not be familiar with the names Chip Lord, Starr Sutherland, and Curtis Schreier, but odds are good you've seen and loved their work. As members of art collective the Ant Farm, the trio helped construct the Cadillac Ranch, those 10 finned cars sunk halfway into the ground of an Amarillo, Texas, cornfield.

From 1968 to 1978, the Ant Farm pulled off any number of hoaxes and high jinks in the name of societal criticism and compelling visuals. One of the more famous, called Media Burn, is a film of yet another Cadillac, crashing into a stack of TV sets. The Ant Farm DVD Release Party and Screening includes viewings of the DVD, which also features another of the group's famous productions: a reenactment of the Kennedy assassination called The Eternal Frame. Lord, Sutherland, and Schreier appear at 7:30 p.m. at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 701 Mission (at Third Street), S.F. Admission is $6-7; call 978-2787 or visit www.filmarts.org.
-- Hiya Swanhuyser

Caddy Smack: Ant Farm's Media 
Burn.
Philip Makanna
Caddy Smack: Ant Farm's Media Burn.
Ya don't need an art degree to 
appreciate a 
picture of Akemi.
dave deluxe
Ya don't need an art degree to appreciate a picture of Akemi.

Wong's Star Rises
Anna May be worshipped

WED-THURS 3/10-11

Looks like everybody's going nuts for Anna May Wong. It's about time, too -- the woman so talented that she consistently stole scenes from the likes of Marlene Dietrich and Douglas Fairbanks is overdue for renewed popularity. In 1929's Piccadilly, she had her moment: a starring role in a fabulous picture. Sadly, because of American racial prejudice, she had to go to Europe to find it. The movie screens at 2, 4:30, 7, and 9:30 p.m. at the Castro Theatre, 429 Castro, S.F. Admission is $5-8; call 621-6120 or visit www.castrotheatre.com.
-- Hiya Swanhuyser

Working-Class Art

THURS 3/11

I like art as much as the next moron. Even so, the prospect of squinting at a painting that looks like two coffee stains and a Crayola squiggle while some pretentious aesthete natters on about the piece's significanceand appealis almost as much fun as scraping spider eggs off the bottom of my fridge. Lo-Fi Customs Gallery counters art's exclusive rep with the Lo-Fi Lowbrow Roundup: A Demolition Derby of Lowbrow Art. Among the striking proletarian picks are Dave Deluxe's luscious photographs of punk rock pinup girls, the automaton-approved paintings of Eric Joyner (who specializes in portraits of clunky toy robots in unlikely locales), and the far-out flash of rock 'n' roll show posters from DX and Firehouse Kustom Rock Art Company. Gape to your heart's content starting at 6 p.m. at 1776 Mission (at 14th St.), S.F. Admission is free; call 861-0500 or visit www.loficustoms.com.
-- Joyce Slaton

 
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