An Impersonation of Angels, or The Enigma of Desire

A little poetic inspiration and a lot of goofy impersonation of the surreal

Details

Through March 13

Tickets are $10-20

431-8423

www.kal iyuga.com

Exit on Taylor, 277 Taylor (between Eddy and Ellis), S.F.

Related Stories

More About

An Impersonation of Angels started four years ago as Salvador Dali Talks to the Animals -- Dan Carbone's teeming life of Dali, performed in the manner of a surreal painting. Audience members who have already seen the new version may not believe me when I say it's more coherent than the old one, but it is. Impersonation follows Dali through life and death, as he learns to be an artist and ages into a melancholy self-caricature. He's pursued by someone we meet in the first scene, "Dead Baby Salvador in Limbo" -- a baby in frilly pajamas played by the bearded, stentorian-voiced Paul Gerrior. It seems Dali's mother miscarried a child named "Salvador Dali" before the great painter was born. This Baby Salvador haunts the artist with questions of life, death, and identity. The play has flashes of pure brilliance: When Carbone is good, he's both hilarious and sublime. But a lot of it is still disjointed and frustrating. Christian Cagigel stands out in the cast as Federico García Lorca, giving an eloquent speech about poetic inspiration, or duende; later he dies with harrowing musicality as a bull, stabbed in the back with colorful red picas, his masked head resting on a silver platter while Dali talks to his treacherous wife Gala about evil and love and a maternal woman chirps like a bird in a tree. These rhythmic, musical, choreographed scenes are the strongest: They have duende, while the rest of the play shambles through mere silliness, or a goofy impersonation of the surreal.

 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
 
©2014 SF Weekly, LP, All rights reserved.
Loading...