Feeling City

New magazine's urban fixation

FRI 12/3

Psychogeography, the study of a physical setting's effects on human behavior and mood, is a burning interest among the editors of up-and-coming magazine Instant City. Here's an example: People who move from the country to the city inevitably notice that neighborhoods function exactly like small towns. They're insular, they have particular customs, and locals in both places tend to be wary of carpetbaggers. You won't see any such characteristics on an official map, but they're real. With this in mind, contributors to Instant City plan to create fiction, nonfiction, and visual artwork reflecting San Francisco's unique energy.

The launch party features performances and readings by contributors such as musician Sara Jaffe, whose sweet folk "Sea Song" references the mostly forgotten ships buried beneath downtown streets. Other performers include author/musician/TV show host Kathi Kamen Goldmark (a member of lit-rock band the Rock Bottom Remainders, along with Amy Tan and Stephen King) and photographer Charles Gatewood (best known for vividly documenting the fetish scene). Instant City aims to "create a subjective, ever-changing map of the city" starting at 7:30 p.m. at Adobe Book Shop, 3166 16th St. (at Valencia), S.F. Admission is free; call 864-3936.
-- Hiya Swanhuyser

Layers of meaning in the Mission District.
Mitche Manitou
Layers of meaning in the Mission District.
Raquel Teitler's own rack.
Raquel Teitler
Raquel Teitler's own rack.
Go Scorps!
Go Scorps!

Sonic Pioneer
An Eno redux

FRI 12/3

Most past or present rave attendees are intimately familiar with Brian Eno's electronica output; is there a chill room that doesn't play at least one cut from Music for Airportsover the course of a long night? But before Eno became the Father of Ambient he made four of the most innovative, ingenious, and flat out freakiest pop records of all time. Chief among them is Taking Tiger Mountain (by Strategy), the pricelessly quirky 1974 album filled with songs like the soaring art-rock masterpiece "Mother Whale Eyeless" and the skittering, uneasy "Third Uncle" (later a minor hit for Bauhaus). Tonight Enorchestra reminds fans of their hero's range with faithful covers culled from Tiger Mountain and other Eno albums. Ovarian Trolley and the Guilty Party open at 10 p.m. at the Bottom of the Hill, 1233 17th St. (at Missouri), S.F. Admission is $8; call 621-4455 or visit www.bottomofthehill.com.
-- Joyce Slaton

It's Tops
Photos say thanks for the mammaries

SAT 12/4

Some defy gravity, some droop. Some are round, some are pointy, some are flat as a tabletop. Some are all-natural, some are filled with salt water or silicone. But they're all welcome at "The Joy of Breasts," Raquel Teitler's photographic paean to bosoms of all shapes and sizes featuring more than 100 images of the udders of dozens of subjects. Meat pillows also figure largely into the exhibit's launch party, aka "OPEN," a risqué affair boasting such attractions as a grope-friendly Second Base Booth, a Breast-in-Show poll, go-go dancers, and erotic pastries. Save us something with a nipple at 8 p.m. at One Taste, 1074 Folsom (at Seventh Street), S.F. Admission is $10-20; call 503-1100 or visit www.onetastesf.com.
-- Joyce Slaton

That Stings

FRI 12/3

Screaming guitars, a giant beat, and hits including "Rock You Like a Hurricane": There are no finer purveyors of slickly produced heavy metal than Germany's the Scorpions. These famous heshers can fill all your leather pants needs, if you know what we mean. Tesla and Keith Emerson open at 7 p.m. at the HP Pavilion, 525 West Santa Clara (at North Autumn), San Jose. Admission is $25.50-49.50; call (408) 287-9200 or visit www.hppsj.com.
-- Hiya Swanhuyser

 
My Voice Nation Help
 
©2014 SF Weekly, LP, All rights reserved.
Loading...