Repertory Film Listings

Commentary by Gregg Rickman (greggr2006@yahoo.com). Times compiled from information available Tuesday; it's always advisable to call for confirmation. Price given is standard adult admission; discounts often apply for students, seniors, and members.

We're interested in your film or video event. Please send materials at least two weeks in advance to: Film Editor, SF Weekly, 185 Berry, Suite 3800, San Francisco, CA 94107.

ACT ONE/TWO

2128 Center (at Shattuck), Berkeley, (510) 464-5980, www.landmarktheatres.com. $9.50. This duplex offers a midnight movie series (plus "drawings for valuable and coveted prizes") on weekends. For additional screenings, see our Showtimes page.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: Go for Zucker! (Dani Levy, Germany, 2005) 4:15, 7:15 p.m.

STARTS FRIDAY: Call for films and times.

MIDNIGHT SHOWS (Friday & Saturday): Camp counselors unite for a Wet Hot American Summer (David Wain, 2001) midnight.

ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE

345 Bush (at Polk), 775-7755, www.afsf.com. French-language films shown on projected video. $6 donation save as noted.

WEDNESDAY (March 8): Secrets of the Resistance era are stirred up by a schoolteacher in De L'Histoire Ancienne (Orso Miret, France, 2000) 6 p.m.

ARTISTS' TELEVISION ACCESS

992 Valencia (at 21st Street), 824-3890, www.atasite.org. $5 save as noted. This venue offers all manner of strange and unusual video and film.

THURSDAY (March 9): The fourth annual Absolute Time Film Festival opens with Polleke (Ineke Houtman, Netherlands), about an 11-year-old girl dealing with the chaos in her life 8 p.m.

FRIDAY (March 10): Absolute Time -- Three shorts about working include San Francisco filmmaker Leah Wolchok's meditation on the American work ethic, Living to Work; The Lace Peddler (Eytan Ipeker), about a Jewish man in 1950s Istanbul; and Walking the Line (Jeremy Levine and Landon Van Soest), about vigilantes at the U.S./Mexican border 8 p.m.

SATURDAY (March 11): Absolute Time -- A program of shorts from all over the world on themes of work and human rights includes Walk in the Light (M.R. Stiff), about a grass-roots gay church, and Bullets in the Hood (Terrence Fisher and Daniel Howard), about living with gun violence 4 p.m. ATA's Other Cinema screens a program of "Cameras on Catastrophe," film, video, slides, and live discussion of new work documenting the Darfur genocide and Hurricane Katrina. Titles include Mark Brecke's They Turned Our Desert Into Fire, Phil Cox's Darfur's Dirty War, and a New Orleans installation featuring DV interviews by Bill Daniel. $6-20 sliding scale 8:30 p.m.

SUNDAY (March 12): ATA and La Pocha Nostra open a mix of live performance, video, and music, "Intox Lounge: Children of Kali." Videos include work by Jen Cohen, Evans Hanke, Mike Missiaen, and others. $5-15 8-11 p.m.

BALBOA

3630 Balboa (at 38th Avenue), 221-8484, www.balboamovies.com. $8.50 save as noted. This great neighborhood house shows films of all sorts.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: All four "Oscar Short Documentary Films" with intermission between pairs. Single admission for both pairs. The Death of Kevin Carter (Dan Krauss) and God Sleeps in Rwanda (Kimberlee Acquaro and Stacy Sherman) 1:40, 4:30, 7:20 p.m. The Mushroom Club (Steve Okazaki) and A Note of Triumph (Corinne Marrinan and Eric Simonson) 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 p.m.

FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY (March 10-16): Two premieres -- When the Sea Rises (Yolande Moreau and Gilles Porte, France, 2005) 1, 5, 9 p.m. Electric Shadows (Xiao Jiang, China, 2005) 3, 7 p.m. See Opening for reviews.

CASTRO

429 Castro (near Market), 621-6120, www.thecastrotheatre.com. $9 save as noted. Short-run rep in a spectacular 1922 Greco-Roman-themed palace designed by Timothy L. Pflueger. Evening intermissions feature David Hegarty on the Mighty Wurlitzer.

WEDNESDAY: A new print of Alfred Hitchcock's unchallenging charmer To Catch a Thief (1955), with Cary Grant as a once, and perhaps still, master criminal 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 p.m.

THURSDAY: A live production of Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues. See www.vday.org for more information. $30 8 p.m.

FRIDAY: A "Punk Grrrl Triple Feature" offered by "Midnites for Maniacs" and hosted by Jesse Ficks screens Valley Girl (Martha Coolidge, 1983; 7:30 p.m.) with VG Deborah Foreman romanced by punk Nic Cage; The Legend of Billie Jean (Matthew Robbins, 1985; 9:45 p.m.), with Helen Slater leading a self-defense crusade; and Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains (Lou Adler, 1981; midnight), with Diane Lane and Laura Dern in a punk band. $10.

SATURDAY & SUNDAY: An Ed Wood Film Festival screens a newly colorized version of Plan 9 From Outer Space (1959), plus home movies, commercials, and more Sat 7 p.m.; Sun 2, 4, 6, 8 p.m.

STARTS MONDAY: Call theater for program.

FOREIGN CINEMA

2534 Mission (between 21st and 22nd streets), 648-7600, www.foreigncinema.com. Free with meal. This restaurant screens foreign films, usually in 35mm, on the back wall of its outdoor patio, with drive-in speakers available for the tables of those who want to watch while they dine.

DAILY: Life's out of balance but the Philip Glass music isn't in the city symphony Koyaanisqatsi (Godfrey Reggio, 1982), screening through March 26. "Starts at dusk."

LA PEÑA CULTURAL CENTER

3105 Shattuck (at Prince), Berkeley, (510) 849-2568, www.lapena.org for venue; www.sfirishfilm.com for program. This cafe for activists offers occasional film screenings. $10 each; $15 both shows.

SUNDAY (March 12): The Irish Film Festival offers two programs here. "Magners and Shorts" 3 p.m. TBA 6 p.m.

LARK

549 Magnolia (at Post), Larkspur, 924-5111, www.larktheater.net. This single-screen art deco theater mixes new and repertory programming. $9 save as noted.

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