The Ice-Breaker

Even when saturated with scientific jargon, the script reads like poetry

Sonia, a young woman wandering through the snows of Antarctica, stumbles upon a diary of intriguing geological findings that's detailed with emotion. The diary impacts Sonia's lifework and, years later, initiates her search for the scientist who authored it. Lawrence is a scientist who abandoned the geology of the Arctic to settle, paradoxically, in the desert where his thoughts would never revisit "the ice." Sonia enters his hermitage to change all that. Her enthusiasm and curiosity melt the frigid barriers posed by Lawrence. They discuss research and divulge secrets within the cozy desert dwelling — a lovely creation of set designer Robert Mark Morgan. Conversations reveal truths in science that parallel truths in life. Just like Lawrence's diary, the script by playwright David Rambo reads very poetically, even when saturated with scientific jargon. While the terminology may be overwhelming, the passions of the characters speak loud and clear. Blake Lindsley, as Sonia, offers a fervency that brightens the entire stage and complements the tender introvert we discover in Lawrence, skillfully played by Charlie Shaw Robinson. The world premiere of The Ice-Breaker is graced with talent at every layer, from the designers to the performers. The brainy, intimate story is thoroughly engaging.

 
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