Joyful Reunion

Sacto heavyweights Kai Kln rise from the ashes

Back in the early '90s when Northwest grunge acts were forging a new style of heaviness indebted to Sabbath, Sacramento's Kai Kln seemed poised to explode from its rabid regional cult. The quartet spotlighted the potent roar of frontman Gene Smith and was powered by his uncanny six-string interplay with fellow guitarist Sherman Loper and the ferocious propulsion of drummer Neil Franklin and bassist Scott Anderson. The overall sound mixed the anthemic muscle and blues-drenched riffology of '70s rock titans with the breakneck tempos of hardcore punk. Although the act disintegrated in 1994, Kai Kln is preparing to once again unleash its onstage fury.

Standing outside the Bottom of the Hill during a recent visit to S.F., the gregarious Franklin recalled how quickly things originally jelled for the band. Though he and Loper had played together since high school, Smith's arrival marked a turning point: "Gene came to the house to play guitar and sing with another group, but [after] me and Scott ended up jamming with him ... we're like, 'Uh, our guitar player isn't here, but we're going to [ask] if you want to be in the band right now.'"

By the next year, the foursome had adopted the moniker Kai Kln (a ridiculous mythical figure Franklin dreamed up) and amassed a solid body of material, moving from playing keg parties to packing local spots like the Cattle Club. The band's first self-released effort — the cassette-only Rhythm of Strange in 1991 — presented relentless riffs and epic tunes, but it wasn't until the brilliant follow-up CD Vigoda that the group truly captured the neck-snapping power of its live show. Packed with swaggering, two-fisted rockers like "Punker Than Thou" and "Blur" while touching briefly on a softer acoustic side, the album attracted major labels like Reprise, Mercury, and Capitol.

Kai Kln bring back the heavy.
Curtis Stankalis
Kai Kln bring back the heavy.

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Admission is $10; call 621-4455 or visit www.bottomofthehill.com for more info.
Bottom of the Hill

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So why didn't Kai Kln rise to world domination? As often happens, Smith's home life intervened. "When we were getting bids from record companies, an A&R woman started talking about living on the road for months and I'd just had a daughter," he explained in a later phone conversation. "And I thought, 'I don't want to sell myself to the record company.'"

It took time to heal from the sudden split, but the band's musical bond brought the members back together in 1995. Kai Kln picked up where it left off, giving incendiary live performances and reissuing its earlier work before finally releasing a third album — The Matter of Things in 1997 — and parting ways once more. Smith and Franklin have continued their partnership in a jazzier direction as the Ricky and Del Connection, while Smith recently issued a solo acoustic debut that deftly juggles intricate Leo Kottke-style 12-string workouts, mandolin blues and spirituals, and country-tinged songwriting. Still, the constant badgering of Kai Kln fans finally prodded the group to fly the relocated Anderson up from Los Angeles recently for a test-run gig at a Sacramento party. Word has it the fire between the players was still there in abundance.

Smith says he has material written with Kai Kln in mind, but no one in the band can predict the future. "I don't know what will happen," he says with a laugh. "In our minds, we never really broke up and we never will. We're like the phoenixes of rock and roll; we rise real quick and then die." Here's hoping Kai Kln burns longer and brighter this time around.

 
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