SF Weekly Letters

Snarky Isn't The Word We Would Use
Rhymes with "gour srapes": Someone once said, "There are lies and there are damn lies." Perhaps it was that poor little victim, J.T. LeRoy ["Living Without LeRoy," Jonathan Kiefer, Feature, 11/5].

Laura Albert and Savannah Knoop still get free publicity and other free services from their cunning child abuse/HIV-positive con that proved not only premeditated but also relentless. Why haven't they been legally denied all monies their illegal activities won them?

Prep-school alum, starfucker, fashion designer — and now memoirist. I hope the inevitable filmmakers change enough details so Knoop can't receive a penny from their work. (An easily swayed liar and frontman? Girl, the Republicans need you!)

Poor little thing, so vulnerable but brave at her own book signings. She needs a hug. Just make sure to secure your wallet to an antitheft chain first. And poor little Albert, betrayed by her crime protégée. Con artists who play the victim card should be ashamed of themselves. They didn't mean to start out that way. They just sort of grew into it. The whole thing evolved. Hold on a second while I flip over this old Devo album.

And golly gosh, now they're not on speaking terms. Don't tell me, let me guess: Jerry Springer for the fighting and flashing, followed by the pouty lips on Oprah while being scolded.

And if you find me snarky, I'm curious about something. What's the word ya got for them?

Name Withheld for Fear the Heiress

Knoop Will Sic Her Minions on Me

and Force Me to Wear Her

Fall Men's Collection

San Francisco

Whips, Chains, and Yawns
Making a passé: People just don't want to admit that the whole scene has gotten old and tired ["Ball Busters," Bonnie Ruberg, Sucka Free City, 11/5]. We've seen so many naked people and painted people and pierced people that it just doesn't titillate like it used to. The transportation situation is focusing some of that free-floating erotic ennui. But the fact is that Exotic Erotic has become boring.

Trannypanny

Web Comment

Courting Equality
Keep your religion out of my marriage: This isn't something the American people need to vote on — it's something the judicial system needs to answer ["Gay Marriage: Next Stop, U.S. Supreme Court," Matt Smith, The Snitch, 11/4]. The people of the United States do not have a right to pass a law or laws that discriminate against a minority, whether that minority is gay, straight, black, white, disabled, or not disabled. When you pass a law that says only a man and a woman can enter a marriage, that's exactly what you are doing: You are discriminating against a minority. How can a minority win against something that is voted on by a majority? They can't, and that's why the courts had to step in for black people and for women. Just as women and black people can now vote, gay people should have their equal rights as well.

Don't bring religion into this. Weren't the Ten Commandments removed from the steps of a courthouse? Separation of church and state is a very serious matter. People act like their religion is the law; that doesn't mean they're right. Keep religion out of the law. Practice your religion on your own time, but do not force your Bible on to me, or anyone for that matter. If you don't believe in gay marriage, then fine; don't marry someone of the same sex. That doesn't mean you can tell someone else what to do.

Cody Petry

Jacksonville, FL

 
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