SF Weekly Letters

Winners and Loserson "Girl Game"
Rare meat: Being a single, heterosexual adult female in the Bay Area was one of the most painful, frustrating decades of my life ["Girl Game," Ashley Harrell, Feature, 3/3]. I got more offers from gay couples and trannies than from heterosexual men. The ones I found were generally noncommittal and a bit skittish.

I'm attractive by industry standards, and petite. I put some effort into my appearance. I always thought something was wrong with me. I escaped to the East Coast last year, and the men here are more than making up for San Francisco. I am approached and complimented daily. By men. Who like women.

Single S.F. ladies, import your meats or get the hell out if you want to date. It'll be the best thing you ever did for your love life.

Clarice Smart

Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Chubby hubby: Good God, this makes me glad to be fat, middle-aged, and Midwestern. Looks aren't everything. I know that sounds like sour grapes, and yes, I do need to work on my looks and make sure I don't get too lazy, ambitionwise. But honestly, looks, status, and cutting-edge creative and intellectual cred aren't everything.

I met a "diamond in the rough" about five years ago and took a chance on him. That lovable schlub lives to spoon and snuggle me, talk my ear off, and give me unsolicited hugs and pecks on the cheek while passing in the hallway. Yes, I know: corny. I get an unsolicited back rub every morning.

If you're picturing a Bubba, you're mistaken. We're both very progressive and politically active, and he's very well-read and intelligent. I don't know if there are any more lovable schlubs in the Bay Area or if they've been outlawed, but these women should try one sometime.

Teresa Neal

Kansas City, Missouri

Premature rejectulation: I have been a single heterosexual man in the Bay Area for 22 years now, with a two-year break in Texas for grad school. Texas, for all its faults, is a state with women who like men. A man can strike up a conversation with a woman in the grocery line and get a friendly response, not a response suggesting that the man is going to follow her home and molest her pets. This is the Bay Area condition. Women are so suspicious of men approaching them (perhaps for good reasons) that they immediately enact the "bitch shield," as the pickup artist coins it.

Those of us men who are not planning a midnight assault on your cats have been conditioned that Bay Area women don't like men — that to "cold call" will lead to a caustic premature rejection. However, the solution seems easy. Online dating will get you a nice filter of men and women who want to date.

End of story?

Dave Rucker

Berkeley

Herring Today, Gone Tomorrow
Did the sea lions follow the fish?: Thank you for your article regarding the investigation and scientific work associated with the Cosco Busan spill ["Dead Sea," Peter Jamison, Feature, 2/24].

A complete story of the science and biology alone would be fascinating to read. However, the additional threads of how the research was funded; when and to whom the information has been revealed; the federal regulation involved; the criminal and civil litigation; and the economic and personal effects of the event combine into a framework that could ultimately be used to introduce meaningful questions about the micro and macro impacts of globalization.

I was struck by one inescapable conclusion. The spill and resulting fish die-off are the reason that the sea lions left Pier 39. The remarkable thing here is that in all the Chronicle articles I've read about the sea lion story, the possibility of such a connection was never mentioned. The next question is whether this means the Chronicle reporters are complicit in, or victims of, the policy of secrecy surrounding the Cosco Busan investigation.

Tim Sheiner

San Francisco

 
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