"It kind of encompasses the next generation of hip-hop — in sound, in attitude, and shoot, you could even say in race," he says. "It's more widely accepted that white folks are rapping now. She's a female; she's got that swag, that Bay Area swag, in the way she talks."

Yet for everyone heralding Kreayshawn as a new brand of rapper, there are skeptics — even haters — saying her flow isn't up to snuff or that her sound is too out-there. Other critics have taken on her race. One writer for Clutch magazine dismissed her as the latest example of whites appropriating black culture. A local feminist blog insisted that "dismissiveness and denigration of black women animate her success." Many have speculated that the White Girl Mob must be suburban kids acting black to get famous.

Her supporters give little credence to these arguments. "People started hating on her when she first dropped, like 'Look at this white girl, stealing our culture and making wack songs,'" D Sharp recounts. "But if you really listen to 'Gucci Gucci,' that shit kinda dope. The beat and her delivery on that shit? I mean, it's a dope record."

Perhaps the biggest controversy isn't of her own making. Wherever Kreayshawn goes, she gets asked about White Girl Mob member V-Nasty's habit of using the word "nigga" in everyday speech — often by people who think Kreayshawn uses it, too. In one recent interview, Philadelphia radio personality Tazz Daddy hammered her:

Tazz Daddy: A lot of people are very upset with your free use of the word "nigga."

Kreayshawn: I don't say that. That's V-Nasty.

Tazz Daddy: ... Do you talk to her about it?

Kreayshawn: Well, when we're in Oakland ... before everyone was staring at us, it was like, 'Yeah, I don't care if she says it, that's Vanessa.' But now that everyone's freaking out about it, thinking I'm saying it ... Now I'm like, 'Vanessa, come on, please.' ... She doesn't get it. Now I'm onstage and I gotta answer this question, and it's V-Nasty's fault.

Tazz Daddy: Pretty much! Because the black people's like, 'Tazz, we're going to kick your ass if you don't ask her. I don't listen to her music, man, but ... ask her!'"

Kreayshawn: Is someone going to sock me in the face right now? 'Cause I'm feeling a little intimidated.

Tazz Daddy: Why, 'cause I'm all big, you all little, I'm all black, you all white — you feel intimidated?

The word upsets people in Oakland, too. Davey D, a prominent Oakland hip-hop journalist, doesn't even like it when black people use the word. "So I'm certainly not going to give them a pass to do it," he says. "If you stand in front of me, I'm certainly going to say something to you."

The question with Kreayshawn, then, seems to be: Will people eventually accept who she is — especially those outside of the Bay Area?

She has already won acceptance from the likes of Snoop Dogg, who collaborated with her on a song, and Drake, who called in to flirt while she was on a radio show. Yet Kreayshawn's swag-filled ovaries are an unusual product of a unique place — the diverse streets of San Francisco and Oakland. And the last hot rap movement to come from those streets went cold very quickly.


The Mercedes sedan glides into the drab intersection of 45th and Market streets in Oakland, its arrival heralded by a strip of metallic lavender along the bottom and a gleaming sea of gold above. The huge fuselage rolls up next to a curb and out of the driver's side rises a tall, thick figure wearing a blazing red T-shirt, a Young and Reckless baseball cap pointed mostly backward, and impossibly baggy jeans fastened somewhere just above the knees. Around his neck hangs a long golden chain with a diamond-encrusted medallion at the end. "Mistah F.A.B.," it reads.

On his home turf, this Oakland rapper seems to know all and be known by all. He tells the neighborhood kids hanging around to put the bottle of champagne they're drinking in a paper bag. He discusses plans for a block party with passersby. He encourages a 13-year-old to get through school and keep his grades up.

A few years ago, F.A.B. was one of the figureheads of a Bay Area rap movement called hyphy, which seemed poised to be the next big thing. With a likeable goofiness, hyphy advocated "going dumb." It employed a lexicon of alien local slang, and made famous the practice of putting a moving car in neutral and getting out to dance on the hood. (F.A.B.'s biggest hit was about this move, called "ghost-riding the whip.") But hyphy didn't blow up nationwide — at least not the way F.A.B., his peers, and the execs who signed them to major-label deals expected. The movement simply didn't find a large enough appeal.

After things fizzled out, Mistah F.A.B. retained his local stardom and, crucially, his freedom to release music independently. His life experience has arguably made his music more interesting. This year he released a song called "Blame Me" — a biting, sarcastic missive to fans and critics who blamed him and other Bay Area rappers like E40 and Keak Da Sneak for hyphy's failure to go national. "The Bay died, they blamed me," F.A.B. raps. "I got banned, criticized, and ridiculed. Media scapegoat, humiliated like a fool."

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20 comments
John
John

To everybody hating on Lil B and Kreayshawn please STOP. Lil B has a plethora of deep songs and videos on Youtube. However, his ignorant parody songs like "Pretty Boy" and "Wonton Soup" get millions of views while his serious well-put together songs and videos get well under 500K views. Who is the real idiot here? This is because the public eats up ignorance. Listen to Lil B's "Age of Information", "The Trap", "Motivation", "Walk the World", "Myspace", "The World is Ending", "Exhibit Based" and "The Growth". That is only a small sample. All of these songs display a deep message and or complex lyricism. If Lil B is trash, then why do J Cole, Lupe Fiasco, Lil Wayne, Jay Electronica and Cormega co-sign him? Lil B is one of the best rappers to come out the Bay in years. If anybody has a right to say that, it's me. I grew up in Lakeview in SF on Randolph Street looking up to Bay Area rap legends like Cougnut and Cellski.

Ramona Fuller
Ramona Fuller

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Denbaronita2
Denbaronita2

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Emma Pope
Emma Pope

i cant believe this!! me and my sister just got two i-pads for $42.77 each and a $50 amazon card for $9. the stores want to keep this a secret and they dont tell you.go here, pluscent.com

Emma Pope
Emma Pope

i cant believe this!! me and my sister just got two i-pads for $42.77 each and a $50 amazon card for $9. the stores want to keep this a secret and they dont tell you.go here, pluscent.com

Emma Pope
Emma Pope

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Hip Hop Jewelry Store
Hip Hop Jewelry Store

Hip hop trend has become most popular trend in today’s world and growing highly over past decades which has led hip hop diamond jewelry as the most popular jewelry in people.

Druciferschild
Druciferschild

Well, they all suck. That's the bottom line. I think enough people have mentioned how much all of these TALENTLESS people are invading the already stupid ass RAP syndicate of the bay area. Let's just clarify that reeeeeal quick. THIS SHIT IS RAP, NOT HIP HOP and it also sucks.

onenine
onenine

These SF weekly articles on Bay Area Hip Hop are just as bad as the gimmick artists (Lil B, Kreayshawn) they are "promoting". Aren't these writers supposed to offer up their own opinions instead of calling any song with 2 million Youtube hits dope. Can we please get some articles on Bay Area artists who actually have real talent?

Walter White
Walter White

What the fuck? Why would you group actual talented rappers like Mistah FAB, Roach Gigz, or Odd Future with goofy novelty acts like Kreayshawn or Lil B?

Thatisoutstanding
Thatisoutstanding

Here's another hip term SF Weekly should get familiar with: "D-Rider"

I have no hate at all for these new artists getting their shine on, the problem is the society that supports them. Is the state of our current youth really this jaded? I can't believe i'm talking like this.

Amousai
Amousai

Why does same/lame individual bash SF Weekly, weekly?

Love the blow-up*cover

Kray
Kray

This article is so biased there's no way to take it seriously...

Alltherage
Alltherage

Bay Area Rappers need to stop with the SWAG SWAG stuff....That will come. Give us complete albums. Something that I will knock in the car AND listen to on my headphones and just stare into space.

ABc
ABc

Sf weekly is desperate to latch on to this trend... Honestly the quality is absolute shit an makes this publication look ridiculous

SELLASSIE
SELLASSIE

For the people reading this article upset by the unbalanced perspective presented regarding Bay Hip Hop, you shouldn't be surprised. When is the last time you heard an anti-drug-in-the-community song on corporate radio backed by print. When is the last time you heard a song dealing with our unjust wars that are still going on? When is the last time you heard any hip hop pioneers on corporate radio in rotation? I'll tell you when.. Never. My point is, there has to be a balance. I believe there is room for everyone in the game, but a balanced perspective when it comes to bay area hip hop is rarely seen, read or heard. I'm in the streets, not industry and real BLACK PEOPLE, not "niggas," have serious issues with our culture, our music and our images being pimped out to the highest bidder. But I was always taught, "they'll always be a new "nigga" next year, and it isn't anything to give a "nigga" some money." But there are some of us in this Bay Area Hip Hop game, til our last dying breath, no matter what the cost, will not give the agenda-setters the satisfaction of ruining the world with Sambo-inspired personalities and music. If you don't know who Sambo is, read Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and study the personality which will reveal the Sambo we walk amongst today and represents so many misguided individuals. I'm Sellassie, the Bay Area's Number 1 Anti-House-Negro Emcee and when it comes to the truth and representing the people, you can count on me. Respectfully, Sellassie of M.Y.G.H.E.T.T.O. (Mad Young Generation Here Eternally To Take Over) and we don't sell out.

Dk
Dk

What doea all this have to do with music?

 

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