"The difference is spooky," Sorvari said, comparing the camp to the one he'd volunteered at a week earlier.

A skinny hipster approached in black nerd glasses, a black suit, and a red shirt. Finding out Sorvari was a superhero, he spoke at a clipped pace as he dragged on a cigarette. "There was a crew here of young black kids from around here mostly — apolitical. They were going around saying 'The cops are coming in 10 minutes, everyone get your shit together!' It's my firm belief they were then robbing tents because everyone was leaving." The hipster said another crew of kids did the same thing the night of the general strike.

"Are these kids that were mostly black, too?" Sorvari asked.

ROY SORVARI, A 22-YEAR-OLD FORMER BOY SCOUT FROM ANTIOCH, BECOMES THE RAY, A CRIME-FIGHTING REAL LIFE SUPERHERO.
Joseph Schell
ROY SORVARI, A 22-YEAR-OLD FORMER BOY SCOUT FROM ANTIOCH, BECOMES THE RAY, A CRIME-FIGHTING REAL LIFE SUPERHERO.
THE RAY JOINED MUTINOUS ANGEL (TOP LEFT) AND MOTOR MOUTH ON A RECENT PATROL OF THE TENDERLOIN.
Photos by Joseph Schell
THE RAY JOINED MUTINOUS ANGEL (TOP LEFT) AND MOTOR MOUTH ON A RECENT PATROL OF THE TENDERLOIN.

"Yeah, as reticent as I am to say it."

"I'm from Antioch," Sorvari said. "I know how you feel."

The hipster continued, now about a neo-Nazi skinhead spotted suiting up in black bloc gear the night of the general strike, and "built, military people" in plainclothes smashing windows. Back on the subject of thieves, he said, "There are professional rings of thieves in the camp living here, bro. I mean living here."

"Gosh, I wish the police didn't steal my costume," Sorvari mused.

He reflected as he climbed into the backseat of his parents' Taurus. "I like going out better as a superhero than like this. People seem to recognize me more." He laughed good-naturedly. "When I come here as a Real Life Superhero, I can dive in and help. But when I come here like this, I can't."

"Isn't that like Clark Kent?" asked his mom.

Just two hours later, a 25-year-old camper named Kayode Foster was beaten and shot dead on the sidewalk alongside the encampment. Oakland officials used the homicide as proof that the Frank Ogawa encampment had gotten out of hand, building momentum to evict it four days later.

Later, Roy explained how things might have gone if he'd have been there. He would have "jumped right in," he said. "If I saw the guy who did the shooting, I would tackle him to the ground and take away his gun."

He paused, thinking. "Maybe shoot him once in the leg, so he can't run away."

E-mail Lauren.Smiley@SFWeekly.com

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