A Sound Vision

Pamela Z can bend her voice with just a flick of her wrist. One of the first musicians to integrate technology into her live performances, Ms. Z changed her name from Pam Brooks when she moved to San Francisco in the mid-'80s and needed a moniker that better encapsulated the experimental direction she wanted to take with her work. At a time when the avant-garde music scene was exploding here, she became known for her beautifully surreal, computer-enhanced compositions that take her own vocals and layer them with other disparate inputs. Over the course of her extensive career, she has made music with found-sound pioneers Negativland, bounced ideas off of ambient god Brian Eno, and collaborated with Kronos Quartet cellist Joan Jeanrenaud. She is a fixture at the walk-through solstice concerts at Oakland's Chapel of the Chimes, just as comfortable working her magic in a mausoleum as she is at Lincoln Center. Now the SF Art Institute brings Pamela Z to their picturesque campus for the latest installment of their Graduate Lecture Series. Whether she is performing with an android-like glove or constructing an X-Ray machine that can whisper secrets, this is an artist unafraid to push boundaries. Get a glimpse into her creative process and learn what mind-blowing tech innovations she plans to lay on us next.
Sat., July 7, 6:30 p.m., 2012

 
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