The menu also has a large number of Indian dishes. Dal ($5.95) had the requisite complex layers of spice and heat that makes the simple chickpea stew so appealing. Samosas ($6.25) were stuffed with pea-and-potato curry, though the wrapping was a tad too thick and gluey. Ananda Fuara also has a daily curry served over rice ($11.50), which one day featured a mild, creamy version with mushrooms — nothing that blew the palate away with spice, but warming on a rainy afternoon.

Ananda Fuara's Neatloaf is a vegetarian riff on that Sunday dinner staple.
Anna Latino
Ananda Fuara's Neatloaf is a vegetarian riff on that Sunday dinner staple.

Was forgoing meat for a few meals my path to spiritual enlightenment? Of course not. But dining under the gaze of the Supreme Master and Sri Chinmoy did make me more conscious of the meat I eat every day without thinking about it — turkey sandwiches, sausage on pizza, chicken in pad Thai, and so on. Given all the uncertainty these days around what's in the meat we eat, a little mindfulness isn't a bad thing. Even when it comes with a side of scripture.

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1 comments
mike4321
mike4321

Two negatives don't always make a positive. 

 
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