cute as a bug

Creatures great and small intertwine with the symmetry of an Escher, forgoing predation for symbiosis, in Tiffany Bozic's "Sense of Wonder." In more than fifty acrylic on maple panels, bats hang with bugs, ants swarm unmolested over a Frogmouth bird's gaping beak, a mollusk hitches a ride on a turtle's shell, the lion shall lie down with the lamb, and so on. Some are squee-worthy images of critters yawning or crying—trenggiling and axolotls are inherently adorable—but more often they are poignant, and rendered in detail exacting enough that she netted Artist in Resident status at the California Academy of Sciences. Bozic's creatures flourish under hostile conditions, sporting evolutionary adaptations a la Dougal Dixon's "After Man," to camouflage, mimic, or even support their ecological niche-mates, and in death their bodies continue to house and nourish. According to Bozic, her work "presents her vision of life's struggles and triumphs that are largely autobiographical." With subjects sheltering below ground against fire or drought, or hiding from their own kind, one can only imagine what battles those visions might represent.


Wednesdays-Saturdays. Starts: Oct. 18. Continues through Nov. 16, 2013
 
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