Sigg believes the whole debate is moot because the Natural Areas Program has no means to fund its restoration effort. For four years, officials from various agencies have quibbled over acreage that may never see its crop of miracle shrubbery. That said, Gluesenkamp's specimen appears to be thriving. It might even propagate on its own.

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6 comments
matters
matters

So wish there was a way to stop the juggernaut of tree destruction.


SPEAK FOR THE TREES! 


What is the point of replacing gorgeous useful trees with shrubs that seem to be making their way into the Presidio on their own.


What a fool is man. Nature is moving on, and we chop and chip in order pursue a quixotic ideal. 


The trees are gorgeous, historic, useful. Stop the chop. Now.


We lost enough trees in the Rim Fire. Let's save the ones we have. 


It's a city.

jjlasne
jjlasne

Considering the state of independent, non-conformist and contrarian San Francisco, you would think every non-native species would have been replaced by marijuana plants by now... Although only city workers seem to be the ones napping on the job.

Heather Gulino
Heather Gulino

This is the best headline ever. Hi five, Rachel.

Sierrajeff
Sierrajeff

1) SF Weekly, stop the pop-up ads or I'll stop visiting the site.

2) San Francisco is a *CITY* - it's not a park, and certainly not a wilderness.  It has to accommodate the needs of almost a million residents and hundreds of thousands of visitors, all in less than 49 square miles.  It's ludicrous to try to impose the same rules on city parkland and Sierra wilderness (whether that's regulations on dog walking, or trying to create self-sustaining colonies of marginal native plants).

3) Our ancestors planted Monterey pine (a CA native, just not in the Bay Area) and eucalyptus (admittedly a problem species) for a reason - without them the western part of the city is winder and colder.  And frankly they're d*mn nice to look at - the view coming in from Marin is ugly now that the Presidio's chopped down the Monterey pine above Baker Beach.  12,000 years ago the bay didn't exist; 100 years from now the Marina District may be under water.  Things change.  Spending all this time and effort to restore a few acres of native land - *in a dense urban environment* - is ridiculous.

jjlasne
jjlasne

Dogs have more rights than people!

 
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