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Get up, Stand up 

Wednesday, Dec 18 2013
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In a career that has spanned three decades (and counting), Jamaican reggae artist Stevie Culture has done it all — backup singer to reggae all-stars like Dennis Brown, leader of his own acclaimed band, and producer of new Jamaican singers. Culture has earned the right to take an expansive view with his songs, which echo with familiar music templates, especially roots reggae, and also showcase political and philosophical lyrics. You dance at a Stevie Culture concert, but your head also spins with ideas — including about reggae itself. At a concert a few years ago, for example, Culture told his fans, "Reggae music has evolved into something that I don't even know what it is anymore. All they talk about is their blings, and their cars, and their rims, and how much money they are making, and who is the bigger star. And reggae is not all about that. Bob Marley and Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer did not fight the system for reggae to be that. We fight for reggae to defend equal rights and justice." Culture then performed one of his best-known songs, "No More," with the audience singing along and dancing the night away.


Thu., Dec. 26, 9:30 p.m., 2013

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Jonathan Curiel

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