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Jahi Mcmath And The Legal Battle Around Brain Death

Usually, I use this column to answer questions.  Today, I will discuss…

 

PG&E Customers May See Fee Hike In Light Of North Bay Fires

This week’s column expands on last week’s discussion of the implications of…

 

What CalFire reports mean to those impacted by North Bay fires

This week’s question comes from Alexis in Napa county, who writes: Q:…

 

4 Frugal Living Tips You Should Try This Year

Frugal living has been gaining interest in the past few years. More…

Safe Swimming Expanded With State Law

Summer is upon us and each year it’s important to revisit safety…

Legislation reduces risks of e-scooters

Today’s column continues where last week’s left off regarding legal responsibility for…

Hoverboard Laws May Apply to Renegade E-Scooters

  This week’s question comes from Tricia P. in South of Market,…

Landlord liability in cases of danger, injury

This week’s question was first posted in December 2015. It comes from Kimmie L., who asks:  Q: Wet weather recently has caused the steps and stairs at my apartment entrance to be slippery. I fell and ended up at the emergency room. Is my landlord responsible?  A: Hi, Kimmie. I hope you are healing quickly. Injuries and hospital trips are often traumatic events. Unfortunately, you are not the only one dealing with those issues, and you’ve asked a very important question.  The Bay Area has been blessed with some much-needed rain. However, with the rain, there comes potential slipping hazards from the accumulation of water on improperly constructed or maintained surfaces. Some property owners, including apartment owners, do not take the sometimes costly but necessary steps to maintain the property safely, allowing rainwater to accumulate on stairs and entrance ways. When a property becomes unsafe because of the poor design, construction or maintenance, and an injury occurs, it is referred to as a Premise Liability case.  To answer your question, a property owner can be held responsible for premises liability cases if the following conditions are met:  • The responsible party must have owned, occupied and/or controlled the property upon which the injured person was harmed.  • When a landlord that owns an apartment building where a person falls, this element is likely met.  • The owner was negligent in the use or maintenance of the property.  • This is a complicated element that would require analysis of whether the condition was known, should have been known, how long it was apparent and how costly it would be to fix it.  • The owner’s negligence was a substantial factor in causing the harm.  Accidents are often the result of multiple causes, and sometimes people aren’t as vigilant as they could be in keeping an eye on their footing or wearing appropriate footwear. Sometimes there are also other unrelated factors at play. This element anticipates this fact and does not require that the landlord’s negligence be the only cause, but only that it be a “substantial factor” in causing the accident.  Importantly, landowners must use reasonable care to discover any unsafe conditions and to repair, replace or give adequate warning of anything that could be reasonably expected to harm others. They can even be held negligent if they fail to use reasonable care to discover unsafe conditions on the property and to repair, replace or give adequate warnings of anything that could reasonably be expected to harm others. …

Employee Protections Against Wrongful Termination

This week’s question comes from Kate, who asks: Q: “I have a…

Making the most of the initiative process

This week’s question comes from PZ, who asks: Q: “I discovered that…