Quantcast
Three Sexy Events at the Tenderloin Museum - By pkane - March 8, 2017 - SF Weekly
SF Weekly

Three Sexy Events at the Tenderloin Museum

Tenderloin Museum

Our favorite neighborhood museum in the galaxy never fails to enchant us with its stellar programming, and there are several events at the Tenderloin Museum in the near future that have a very high can’t-miss quotient.

First, tomorrow evening (Thursday, March 9) at the Roxie Theater, the museum will screen a Tenderloin-centric double feature of Jonathan Raymond’s late-1960s previously lost short documentary Gay San Francisco followed by Michael Thomas’ Meat Rack, a tale of a bisexual hustler that’s the quintessential queer arthouse flick. Better still, Meat Rack director Michael Thomas — who was 21 when he shot the film in 1970, will be there! You might find yourself so entranced with imagery of what the city looked like 45 years ago that you forget to notice the sexy young things.

Courtesy: Tenderloin Museum

Then, next Thursday, March 16 at 6 p.m., head to the museum proper for the opening of “More Than a Roof and Walls,” an art exhibit created by teaching artists Alice Combs and Susa Cortez with the help of students from Tenderloin community partnerships like Kelly Cullen Community, Community Housing Partnership, and Larkin Street Youth Services. A collage made from polystyrene foam and textiles, it conjures up an interior space with a window looking out, and it’s up through late April.

Finally, on Thursday, March 23, the Tenderloin Museum and artists Arletta Anderson and Adam Smith from a nearby theater space will team up for Counterpulse: Oral Projects, an evening of neighborhood narratives and portraiture, as interviewees discuss the impact that the Tenderloin and the wider city have had on their lives. As locals — possibly including you — share their stories, they’ll have their portraits done. The only constant is change.

Check out the full programming lineup for this most excellent of museums.

Tenderloin Museum398 Eddy St., 415-351-1912 or tenderloinmuseum.org