S.F. Election, June 2018: Latest Results

Stay in the know as the ballots roll in.

Editor’s Note: All results from San Francisco Department of Elections are unofficial. 602 of 604 precincts (99.67 percent) are reporting results in. 

12:30 a.m.

It appears that Leno is ahead! After Breed supporters optimistically announced their win, the ranked-choice voting results showed that Leno has beat her by a tiny margin, gathering 50.42 percent of the votes, vs. her 49.58 percent.

Midnight

The Breed campaign is starting to celebrate just after 11 p.m., with the ceremonial playing of Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, and Delivered.” With results showing Breed ahead at 39 percent, Assemblyperson David Chiu declares, “We are ready to call this race, London Breed!”

Former Mayor Willie Brown takes the stage to congratulate her. “I know it’s premature to say congratulations, but at 84 I don’t get many chances,” Brown says. “I hope for nothing but greatness for the London Breed administration not just for the next year, but for the next nine years.”

Breed gave a victory speech of sorts when she finally arrived for her own party at around 10:10 p.m. “If you could see what I see right now, this is such a beautiful crowd, this has been such an incredible journey,” Breed tells the audience. “This campaign didn’t start four and a half months ago. This campaign started back in 1974 when I was born.”

“When everybody said I’m beholden to somebody, London Breed from O.C., they had it twisted,” Breed said, in a reference to the nickname “Outta Control” that was applied to the San Francisco housing project in which she grew up.

11:00 p.m.

Rafael Mandelman is still in the lead for District 8, with 12, 204 votes, or 61 percent of the votes cast so far. That said, we still have a long way to go, with only 74,988 votes citywide having been counted so far.

Just after 10 p.m., Cafe du Nord was packed with Mandelman supporters — including housing advocates, fellow City College Trustees and Board of Education Commissioner and District 6 candidate Matt Haney — who congratulated him on his win even before a second count of results were in.

“There are too many sick people, drug-addicted people, mentally ill people, who we recycle through jail and hospitals but never actually get into permanent care,” said Mandelman to his crowd of supporters. “We made a pledge that this campaign would be about taking that challenge to San Franciscans, to voters of District 8, and setting for ourselves the goal of making sure that each one of those folks gets brought in off the streets and into care. my pledge is that for as long as I’m in City Hall I will be working every day to bring those people in.”

In reference to the race for mayor, former San Francisco supervisor and Mandelman supporter, Bevan Dufty, said that with the City College Trustee’s win, “we are ushering in a progressive majority” on the board of supervisors.

“No matter who the mayor is, the board sets a big part of the city’s agenda,” said Dufty. “This is a victory.”

Mandelman, too, was optimistic about his first lead. “These are voters who tend to be among the more moderate in the district and they appear to have broken pretty significantly for me,” he said.

Moments later, a second set of returns showed that Mandelman was in the lead at 60 percent, while Sheehy was at 37.9 percent.

“It does appear that I’m winning,” said Mandelman, addressing a cheering crowd. “It looks like I was just elected supervisor.”

Meanwhile, Prop E continues to advance towards a very solid “no” ban on flavored cigarettes, with 68 percent of voters supporting a ban.

Meanwhile, Prop. F continues to do well, with a 56 percent of the vote in support of a right to counsel.

“The Democratic Socialists of America have arrived in San Francisco,” said a jubilant Dean Preston. “And the scariest thing for the landlords, real estate agents, speculators, is the alliance of the DSA and the tenants’ rights groups in this city… When you put together DSA, neighbors united, tenants rights groups, there’s nothing we can’t accomplish.”

Prop. H appears to be solidly losing with 87,170 voting no for the Police Officers Association ballot measure, with 60 percent of the vote in opposition.

Jane Kim appeared melancholy toward the end of the evening.

“Mark and I knew it wasn’t about any individual winning Room 200,” Kim said. “It was about us winning Room 200. We have more fights to win.

“This is my seventh election. I’m not sure how many I have left in me,” she added. “I can’t take this the rest of my life. There’s so many ways to make change in this city. I’m incredibly proud of the vision and agenda we put out for San Francisco. We knew it was an uphill battle.”

10:30 p.m.

“This has been a dream of the Tenant’s Union for many, many years,” says Deepa Varma, executive director of the Tenants Union, in regard to Prop F. “The Tenants Union believes organizing is the beginning, and organizing is the power. But when you are facing a judge as a tenant, and you are alone, it doesn’t look good. This is a historic moment for the country, but it’s looking pretty good that we are changing the conversation around housing and what everybody needs. I’ll see you in fucking court.”

10:15 p.m.

In a drastic turn, it appears Mark Leno has nearly taken the lead. Based on ranked-choice voting, it appears Leno has 47.89 percent of the vote, while Breed has 52.11 percent. In this regard, Leno has nearly cut Breed lead in half when you’re looking at ranked-choice voting.

Hopes are extremely high in the Castro. Mark Leno took the stage at around 9:30 p.m. with a confident smile and an even voice. He announced that the votes counted were exactly what his team predicted he would be at currently, and the Castro was still yet to be considered in that number.

“This has been a fun five months hasn’t it?” he said. “I couldn’t be more proud to be standing here tonight, on this stage, in the Castro. We’re right where we thought we’d be, and we’re still intent on winning this race.”

As he addressed the crowd, he made sure to thank candidates London Breed and Jane Kim.
“London Breed has dedicated her life to this city, so I want to say thank you. I also want to thank Jane Kim.”

At 9:37 p.m. he announced that it would be another hour in the cold before more substantial results would be released.

“So? Are we gonna party on?” He asked the crowd.

“YES!” They screamed overwhelmingly.

Let’s talk propositions (see below for descriptions)! How’s it going? Here’s what’s up:

Prop A has 86,281 votes, or 75 percent.

Prop B has 77,403 votes, or 69 percent.

Prop C has 57,040, or 49 percent of the votes — nearly enough to pass IF Prop D doesn’t. But…

Prop D has 51,740 of the votes in support, only 45 percent. It needs 75 percent of votes to pass.

Prop E is still blowing up, with 80,423, or 68 percent in support of banning flavored tobacco.

Prop F, the right to counsel for renters served with evictions is inching past with 63,235, or 54 percent of the votes.

Prop G is most likely to pass, with 67,240 votes.

Prop H is probably not going to go through (woo!) with 68,320 votes in opposition, or 59 percent of the vote so far.

And lastly, Prop I is surprisingly not doing well, so expect some more sports teams to be stolen by S.F. soon. We have 64,900 people, or 58 percent, in opposition.

10:05 p.m.:

In a drastic turn, it appears Mark Leno has nearly taken the lead. Based on ranked-choice voting, it appears Leno has 47.89 percent of the vote, while Breed has 52.11 percent. In this regard, Leno has nearly cut Breed lead in half when you’re looking at ranked-choice voting.

Hopes are extremely high in the Castro. Mark Leno took the stage at around 9:30 p.m. with a confident smile and an even voice. He announced that the votes counted were exactly what his team predicted he would be at currently, and the Castro was still yet to be considered in that number.

“This has been a fun five months hasn’t it?” he said. “I couldn’t be more proud to be standing here tonight, on this stage, in the Castro. We’re right where we thought we’d be, and we’re still intent on winning this race.”

As he addressed the crowd, he made sure to thank candidates London Breed and Jane Kim.
“London Breed has dedicated her life to this city, so I want to say thank you. I also want to thank Jane Kim.”

At 9:37 p.m. he announced that it would be another hour in the cold before more substantial results would be released.

“So? Are we gonna party on?” He asked the crowd.

“YES!” They screamed overwhelmingly.

9:00 p.m.

The first round of results are in! Here’s what’s happened so far…

London Breed has 27,947 votes, Mark Leno has 20,597 votes, and Jane Kim has 14,021.

This is somewhat expected, as only the early mail-in ballots have been counted so far. Historically, they are from more conservative voters. The next round of votes will be released around 9:45 p.m.

At Jane Kim’s election party, John Avalos was one of the first to arrive at 8 p.m. sharp, ready to continue his support shown from the beginning of the race. In December after Mayor Ed Lee died, he told Kim he wanted her to run.

“Her voice was so strong in 2016,” Avalos said. “I think she’s really needed.”
Folsom Street Foundry Bar Manager Brady James didn’t receive special requests from Kim’s campaign for themed cocktails but he gestured to the glass jug to his left, dubbing it Jane Kim Sangria.

“It’s red, just like her,” James said.

Bartenders are donned in black with red bandanas to match the campaign theme. At 8:31 p.m., the crowd of up to 20 waiting patiently outside holding Jane Kim signs filed in, and the party music began.

Across town at London Breed’s party, Phelicia Jones, union steward for SEIU 1021 and an activist against police brutality, said the night was exciting.

“It’s like Barack Obama winning,” Jones said. “I think it’s that momentous. San Francisco is what they say the golden city by the bay, I say the racist city by the bay. But at the same time we have to get better with inclusion, we have to get better around diversity, we have to get better around healing, and she’s the only one that’s for all San Franciscans.”

At Mark Leno’s event at the intersection of Castro and Market streets, Leno mingled with volunteers and campaign organizers above his dancing supporters from the second floor of 2390 Market St. Dressed in a silver suit, he couldn’t catch a break from everyone eager to shake his hand.
Mark Leno’s Community Outreach Director Brenden Schucart was pleased to hear that Leno is ranked second after the first wave of votes.

“We’re all really excited, and we kind of expected to come in second place, but obviously we hope we get something much bigger.” He said.The crowd at Leno’s party roared with joy after results were released, but they definitely noticed the 9% lead Breed had. Some people looked a little nervous, while others are banking on mail-in-voter results. “We know moderates tend to vote early, and progressives tend to vote late,” Schucart said.
In other election news, Rafael Mandelman is in the lead with 5,683 votes, while Jeff Sheehy lags behind with 3,736.

The S.F. Superior Court judges are also in the lead, with 48,451 for Andrew Cheng compared with Phoenix Street’s 18,549. Curtis Karnow has 40,979 votes to Maria Evangelista’s 24,521. Cynthia Lee has 46,273 votes and Kwixuan Maloof has 13,194. And Niki Solis only has 21,014 to Jeffrey Ross’s 44,540.

Props. C and D are running close, with C garnering 34,945 yes votes, or 53 percent, and D with 33,932, or 46
percent of the vote. The measure with the most votes wins, though C needs 50 percent or more to pass, and D needs 75 percent or more.

The widest ballot measure difference by far is Prop. E, which has 51,922 people (or 69 percent) voting to uphold the ban on flavored cigarettes, and only 23,323, or 31 percent, saying they want to overturn the ban.

Cheat Sheet on What’s What…

Mayor
Jane Kim
Mark Leno
London Breed
___________
Angela Alioto
Amy Farah Weiss
Richie Greenberg
Ellen Zhou

Board of Supervisors, District 8
Rafael Mandelman
Jeff Sheehy

Regional Measure 3 – Bay Area Traffic Relief Plan
Yes
No

Prop A – Public Utilities Revenue Bonds

Prop B – Prohibiting Appointed Commissioners from Running for Office

Prop C – Additional Tax on Commercial Rents Mostly to Fund Child Care and Education

Prop D – Additional Tax on Commercial Rents Mostly to Fund Housing and Homelessness Services

Prop E – Prohibiting Tobacco Retailers from Selling Flavored Tobacco Products

Prop F – City-Funded Legal Representation for Residential Tenants in Eviction Lawsuits

Prop G – Parcel Tax for San Francisco Unified School District

Prop H – Policy for the Use of Tasers by San Francisco Police Officers

Prop I – Relocation of Professional Sports Teams

Superior Court Judge, Seat 4
Phoenix Streets
Andrew Cheng

Superior Court Judge, Seat 7
Curtis Karnow
Maria Evangelista

Superior Court Judge, Seat 9
Cynthia Ming-Mei Lee
Elizabeth Zareh
Kwixuan Maloof

Superior Court Judge, Seat 11
Niki Solis
Jeffrey Ross

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