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Gimme Danger - By sherilyn-connelly - November 3, 2016 - SF Weekly
SF Weekly

Gimme Danger

It’s been 20 years since Jim Jarmusch’s last documentary, 1997’s Year of the Horse, about Neil Young and Crazy Horse. But Jarmusch’s new Gimme Danger shows that some things haven’t changed: He still likes interviewing rock legends in front of washing machines. The legend in question is Iggy Pop, and Gimme Danger is not a look back on Pop’s career, but rather on that of his seminal band the Stooges, which Jarmusch starts off by calling the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band ever. They really aren’t — Neil Young and Crazy Horse aren’t either, though they come closer — but Jarmusch does make a strong case for the Stooges being one of the most influential. The movie follows their rocky career and lives from the formation of the band in the late 1960s to their implosion in 1973, after three albums that essentially invented punk rock. While the Stooges’ 2006 reunification tour is covered, their albums from that year and from 2013 are not. Gimme Danger is one of the more entertaining boom-nostalgia docs of late, but unfortunately, Danny Fields pops up again to slow proceedings to a halt like he did throughout Danny Says. Yes, he was the Stooges’ manager, and he was there then, but that doesn’t mean he needs to be everywhere now.