Acts To See This Week: HVOB, Fishbone



9 p.m., Friday, Feb. 2, at Mezzanine, 444 Jessie St. $35;

A challenge producers often face with creating electronic music — particularly house and techno — is finding that missing element that enables their music to sound more human and organic, a flourish that gives their project an identity to separate themselves from the other thousands of artists in dance music. Production and vocal duo HVOB, which stands for Her Voice Over Boys, have not only succeeded in creating emotionally authentic tracks since the release of their 2013 self-titled debut album, they’ve translated their moody and intense songs into bombastic live performances that give their music a second life outside of the albums. Formed in Vienna, Anna Muller and Paul Wallner have mastered the art of balancing moments of soft melancholy with dark and heavy techno beats, resulting in stunningly original dance tracks that work on the premise of building tension amongst a somber landscape with electronic and organic elements. When performing on stage, Muller and Wallner are joined by a drummer who adds another layer of ferocity to HVOB, further blurring the line between live and electronic music. Tim Casagrande




7:30 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 1, at Cornerstone, 2367 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. $24;

In the 2011 biographical documentary Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone, elite musicians like the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Flea, Gwen Stefani, and Questlove provide testimonials. They face the camera, proclaiming their admiration for Fishbone, with Flea claiming it’s “the band that gave us the inspiration to be a band.” Despite the clout Fishbone has earned among many musicians — and a hefty, dedicated fanbase — the group has never enjoyed mainstream success. The ska, punk, funk, rock, soul, and whatever else the band have been playing under their moniker have endured for nearly four decades. Impressively, most of the original founding members, who all met in middle school growing up in Los Angeles, remain intact, and each possesses a particular skill to navigate seamlessly among various genres while still managing a cohesive sound. The heart of the group lies with kinetic frontman Angelo Moore, who’s gained a reputation for his frantic but always exciting stage performances. Fishbone has long been earmarked for humorous and self-aware social commentary in its lyrics, which can delve deeper into serious issues than you might expect from a band with such a fun-loving, quirky attitude. It is rare to find a band as easy to love as Fishbone. 

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