Don’t Miss These 4 Shows

P-Lo, Chris Isaak, Earth, Wind & Fire, and an OK Computer listening party.

P-Lo (Courtesy Photo)

P-Lo
Hip-Hop

“More than anything, I wanna ball / Watch me, watch me, watch me go get it,” P-Lo spits on his energetic track “More Than Anything.” A song from his 2017 album of the same name, “More Than Anything” depicts the artist’s ambitious scramble for success in the hip-hop industry.

However, P-Lo is far from being a newcomer to the rap scene. A Bay Area native, he’s had an indisputable influence on the region’s hip-hop culture, as both a producer and rapper. He’s helped produce projects such as Sage the Gemini’s Hot 100-charting single, “Gas Pedal,” and while in high school, he and Iamsu! co-founded the Heartbreak Gang collective, whose members now include Bay Area musicians like Kool John and Kehlani.

More Than Anything combines slick, animated raps with amplified bass drums and boisterous, fast-paced beats. You can hear the hyphy influences in the light and bouncy rhythms of “College Girls” or in the blatant Mac Dre references in “The One.” The result is a collection of songs ideal for a very specific type of party, one where everyone is dancing un-self-consciously and no one is on their phones. Alexa Lee

With Rexx Life Raj at 8:30 p.m., Friday, July 7, at the Regency Ballroom. $25-$40; theregencyballroom.com

Chris Isaak
Rockabilly

With his crooning voice, romantic lyrics, and pouty pucker, it’s easy to see why people equate Stockton-born musician Chris Isaak with Elvis Presley. Both peddle guitar-forward, rockabilly tunes that revolve around love and heartbreak. And they’ve each got an undeniable swagger — not to mention a penchant for bouffant hairdos — that makes their fans weak in the knees.

“Wicked Game,” Isaak’s 1989 plaintive slow rocker, was his first big hit, and it’s been used in so many films and TV shows — like Days of Our Lives, Friends, Flight of the Conchords, and Beverly Hills, 90210 — that you’d probably recognize it even if it doesn’t ring a bell now.

But even before “Wicked Game,” Isaak was turning heads with his first two albums, which blended country, blues, and folk into one distinctly emotive whole. His debut, Silvertone, caught the attention of director David Lynch, who included two songs — “Gone Ridin” and “Livin’ For Your Lover” — in the 1986 noir classic Blue Velvet, giving Isaak cult-icon cred among fans. Throughout the decades, his raw, visceral music has won the hearts of even more filmmakers, like Stanley Kubrick and Tony Scott, who have included his music in their projects and even, on some occasions, given Isaak an acting role, too.

Now in his 60s, the “San Francisco Days” singer is still touring and playing shows, and he’s become a regular fixture at Mountain Winery’s annual summer concert series. Jessie Schiewe

At 7:30 p.m, Sunday, July 9, at Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga. $59.50-$99.50; mountainwinery.com

Earth, Wind & Fire
Funk, Soul

There are a few lessons to be learned from Earth, Wind & Fire, the seminal ’70s and ’80s funk band responsible for hits like “September,” “Let’s Groove,” and “Boogiewonderland” (and who win the award for having the trippiest music videos ever).

The first is that even though their biggest songs are three decades old, Earth, Wind & Fire is still incredibly popular, garnering more than 5 million monthly listeners across streaming sites and selling more than 90 million records worldwide. The other lesson that Earth, Wind & Fire teaches us is that once you land on something good, keep doing it. Though Now, Then & Forever was released in 2013 and though Illumination features newer artists like will.i.am, Big Boi, Kenny G, and Floetry, EWF still make songs that sound exactly like the stuff that made them famous. Disco might be passé, but that same upbeat, dance-inducing spirit can still be heard in their new stuff, along with other band staples like harmonized vocals and boisterous horns.

Last year, founder Maurice White passed away from Parkinson’s disease, but the band — which now consists of Philip Bailey, Verdine White, and Ralph Johnson — has soldiered on, and their performance at Oracle Arena kicks off their upcoming 22-date “2054 Tour” alongside Nile Rodgers and Chic. Jessie Schiewe

With Chic and Nile Rodgers, at 8 p.m., Wednesday, July 12, at Oracle Arena. $24 and up; ticketmaster.com

OK Computer Listening Party
Rock

Though Radiohead started in the early ’90s, it wasn’t until 1997, when they released their third studio album OK Computer that they struck gold. The self-produced project — which was mostly recorded in a 16th-century manor in Bath, England — expanded Radiohead’s international popularity and has sold more than 4.5 million copies worldwide.

It also represented a shift in the band’s sound and an attempt to distance the group from their previous guitar-oriented, lyrically introspective albums. Instead, OK Computer ushered in a new era for Radiohead, one marked by layered sounds, eclectic influences, abstract vocals, and a whole lot of experimentation.

To commemorate the album’s 20th anniversary, Radiohead released a remastered version with additional tracks called OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997 2017 at the end of June. Audio is also celebrating the forward-thinking record with a full-night of tunes pulled solely from OK Computer, and they’ll turn their recessed dancefloor into a hangout lounge, replete with comfy pillows and rugs to loll around on. Jessie Schiewe

At 8 p.m., Wednesday, July 12, at Audio. $10; audiosf.com

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