Three Must-See Acts This Week

Haywyre, Walker & Royce, and Boombox Cartel

Haywyre

Electronic

Haywyre

9 p.m., Saturday, June 30, at Mezzanine. $20; mezzaninesf.com

Defying the stereotype that electronic musicians are merely “button-pushers and knob-twirlers,” Haywyre, born Martin Vogt, uses his education in classical piano both to his benefit in the studio and on stage. Born in Indiana, Vogt spent most of his early life in Austria, where he became immersed in the country’s rich musical history, beginning piano lessons at age seven. As Vogt’s musical tastes expanded to include jazz and hip-hop, he found himself fascinated by the limitless possibilities electronic music production offered compared to his classical training. At 16, Vogt moved back to the U.S. and adopted Haywyre as his moniker, self-releasing a series of jazzed-out and bass-drowned downtempo albums. The next year, Haywyre’s impressive live remix of Michael Jackson’s “Smooth Criminal” went viral, introducing the world to Vogt’s multifaceted approach to production, as well as a taste of his astounding piano skills. With a viral hit under his belt, Vogt went on to release his fifth and sixth studio albums, 2014’s Two Fold, Pt. 1 and 2016’s Two Fold, Pt. 2, to glowing praise, pointing out Vogt’s innovative composition prowess and skills behind a piano. 

Walker & Royce

Tech house

Walker & Royce

10 p.m., Friday, June 29, at 1015 Folsom. $20; 1015.com

With groovy basslines geared toward filling dance floors and pop hooks catchy enough to sneak their way onto the charts, production duo Walker & Royce’s rapid ascent in the dance world should not come as a surprise to anyone. Comprised of Sam Walker and Gavin Royce, the duo started their production career in 2011, gaining a following in their native Brooklyn as well as abroad, being noticed early on by underground heavyweights like Damian Lazarus and Pete Tong. Walker & Royce’s biggest cosign came in 2015 after Dirtybird Records boss Claude VonStroke noticed them, and the duo’s brand of off-kilter tech house matched perfectly with the label’s roster, allowing them to flourish. Their inaugural Dirtybird release, Boy, is a subdued yet stimulating release with its tongue-in-cheek B-side “I.T.B.” proving that Dirtybird is their true home. After some time in the studio experimenting with different styles, Walker & Royce released their debut album Self Help last October, a genre-bending journey filled with dance floor singalongs like “Take Me to Your Leader” and hip-hop-fronted bangers like “My Own Thang.” In an interview with Billboard, Gavin Royce says of the album’s unique sound that, “it’s like indie techno.” The duo themselves, like many of their fans, are unsure exactly what to classify Walker & Royce’s music as, but that predicament is bound to exist when the music sounds like nothing else that came before it.

 

Boombox Cartel

Trap

Boombox Cartel

10 p.m., Tuesday, July 3, at 1015 Folsom. $30; 1015.com

When high school friends Americo Garcia and Jorge Medina began producing dubstep and hip-hop in their native Monterrey, Mexico, neither had any idea they would soon be playing to thousands at top festivals around the globe. Before their formation in 2012, both Garcia and Medina were passionate about music from an early age, with both bonding over their interest in electronic-music production. After moving to Minnesota to attend school for audio engineering, the duo moved to Los Angeles in 2014 to work their way into the industry. The duo’s grimy yet ethereal trapped-out single “B2U” earned them widespread recognition from dance music fans and fellow producers alike, including RL Grime and Diplo, the latter of whom signed Boombox Cartel to his well-respected Mad Decent label. The duo’s debut EP, Cartel, saw its release last year and succinctly yet powerfully delivers an equal mix of festival-worthy trap bangers and high-energy breaks. Although both members produce Boombox Cartel’s music, Garcia is currently the only member touring due to Medina’s visa issues, but this setback has not stopped Garcia from playing boisterous sets worthy of Boombox Cartel’s riotous reputation.

 

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