Three Must-See Acts This Week

Catz ’n Dogz at The Midway on Sunday, Daughters at The Independent on Sunday, and Sunmi at The Regency Ballroom on Wednesday.

Catz ’n Dogz. Photo by Yonathan Baraki

House

Catz ’n Dogz

1 p.m., Sunday, March 3, at The Midway. $15; themidwaysf.com

A unanimously beloved name within house music since 2003, Poland’s Catz ’n Dogz continue to release sonically rich dance masterworks, and they’re some of the most electrifying DJs in their class. The duo, consisting of producer-DJs Grzegorz Demiańczuk and Wojciech Tarańczuk, met while working together at their local radio station, eventually releasing music under the name 3 Channels, a period when they played rawer and more simplistic dance music compared to the vivid and bubbly production in their later material. Under the Catz ’n Dogz moniker, their international breakthrough came with their remix of Claude VonStroke’s “Who’s Afraid of Detroit.” (VonStroke would become a close friend and music partner for the duo, releasing their first two albums, Stars of Zoo and Escape from Zoo on his own Mothership label.) The two albums established Catz ’n Dogz as one of house music’s most prominent groups, famed for their experiments with stripped-down and organic production. After adding more pop elements on their 2015 album Basic Colour Theory, released on the duo’s own Pets Recordings, the duo returned to Dirtybird last year with two relentless deep house cuts on The Feeling Factory. It prepped listeners for the highly anticipated release of their fourth album, Friendship, which is due this spring. 

Daughters

Noise rock

Daughters

8 p.m., Sunday, March 3, at The Independent. $25; theindependentsf.com

Ranging from brutal noise exercises to inventive art punk, Daughters have always been a visceral sonic experience throughout their dynamic, and at times, turbulent career. The band formed in Providence, R.I., in 2001, and released their self-titled debut EP the following year. It was hardcore punk at its barest, with four songs in under four minutes. Daughters’ debut studio album, 2003’s Canada Songs, followed suit from their noisy EP, being an 11-minute collection of high-pitched screams matched with blistering guitars and drums. Their next effort, 2006’s Hell Songs, marked a dramatic evolution in sound, doubling the length of their songs to include more traditional songwriting elements, but not at the expense of their harsh aesthetic. While recording for their third album, singer Alexis Marshall and guitarist Nicholas Andrew Sadler had a long-running dispute that resulted in Daughters entering an indefinite hiatus. Despite the internal trouble, Daughters released their self-titled third album in 2010 to widespread critical acclaim, with many fans lauding the band’s refined post-punk influenced sound along with Marshall’s idiosyncratic and powerful vocals. Marshall and Sadler slowly began communicating ideas again, reforming in 2013 and releasing their long-awaited fourth album You Won’t Get What You Want last September, with many listeners considering it not only the best in the band’s discography, but one of the best releases of 2018. 

Sunmi

K-pop

Sunmi

7 p.m., Wednesday, March 6, at The Regency Ballroom. $70; theregencyballroom.com

Before K-pop took over the international music landscape, vocalist Sunmi was a member of South Korea’s Wonder Girls, who would make history as the first K-pop artists to earn a spot on Billboard’s Hot 100 with their smash-hit 2008 single, “Nobody.” Sunmi left Wonder Girls in 2010 to attend college, eventually returning to music as a solo artist in 2013, and has since become one of K-pop’s most versatile singers, developing a constantly growing international fanbase in the process. Her debut single, “Full Moon,” established the singer as a singular creative force, moving away from the Wonder Girls’ vintage sound to include more dance and hip-hop influences. Sunmi’s theatrical stage performances, along with her thought-provoking lyricism, have made her one of South Korea’s most talked about singers, making her breakthrough on the international music scene in 2017 with her club-ready hit single “Gashina.” The singer released her excellent second EP Warning last September, and looks to expand her global presence on her first worldwide solo tour. 

 

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