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California Fires Continue to Be Fucking Awful - July 30, 2018 - SF Weekly
SF Weekly

California Fires Continue to Be Fucking Awful

The Carr Fire in Shasta County is 20 percent contained (Photo: Cal Fire)

At least six people have died in the devastating Carr Fire in Shasta and Trinity counties while seven are still missing, officials said Monday.

The Carr Fire took hold on July 23rd and has burned through about 1,000 residences, commercial structures, and outbuildings as of Monday morning. Nearly 99,000 acres also burned and another 5,000 structures are destroyed, Cal Fire reported.

Firefighters have 20 percent of the blaze contained.

In the most significant death toll since the 2017 wildfire season began just 10 months ago, at least eight people have died in wildfires statewide, including two firefighters whose vehicle hit a mechanical failure in the Carr Fire. Another two people firefighters died in the Ferguson Fire near Yosemite and seven people are still missing in Northern California.

About 3, 388 firefighters, including some Bay Area fire departments, are battling the blaze and worked through the night. In a testament to the early — or perpetual — fire season, it is merely one of 19 active fires in the state of California.

Cal Fire did lift some evacuation orders for the Carr Fire on Monday morning but reminded the public to remain vigilant and check back for updated information. Authorities recommend to drive slowly and expect smoke.

Those affected by the Carr Fire have the chance to hear more at Cal Fire’s community meeting conference Monday at 4 p.m. at the Redding Civic Auditorium. Everyone else, get those emergency kits and action plans ready.

In other news to keep us sweating, deadly heat has taken the globe by surprise this summer. At least 91 people have died in a shocking fire in Greece, extreme heat killed more than 70 people and hospitalized 30,000 people in Japan, and at least 65 people died in Pakistan from hotter temperatures in just three days in May.

Temperatures reached as high as 113 degrees Fahrenheit in Redding during the fire this week.

As humans worldwide grapple with the heat, one thing is clear: no amount of plastics bans can save us from this literal hell on Earth in the near-term.