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How Cannabis Is Changing Child-Proof Packaging - By jkukura - January 12, 2017 - SF Weekly
SF Weekly

How Cannabis Is Changing Child-Proof Packaging

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Child-proof packaging has not changed much in the last 46 years. Since child-resistant packaging was first required by the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970, the prescription drug industry has continued to primarily use the “push down and unscrew” pill bottle design that still confounds adults today.

For all of their billions in revenue, the drug industry has not significantly changed their child-resistant packaging in decades. But the increasingly mainstream cannabis industry, the fastest growing industry in the U.S., already has a range of new child-resistant containers on the market.

California is not really at the forefront of child-resistant packaging in the cannabis market. California’s Assembly Bill 266 that regulates the production and sale of marijuana merely requires that “cannabis packages and labels shall not be made to be attractive to children,” and that the phrase “Keep out of reach out of children and animals” appear in bold print on any packaging.

Other cannabis states are far more strict. Of the 26 legal states, 13 have state cannabis laws that do specifically require child-proof packaging. These states are — by necessity — are revolutionizing how legal marijuana is kept out of childrens’ hands.

“There are a lot of packages on the market that claim to be child-resistant, but you don’t need to be an expert to know that they are not,” Jeremiah Buck, founder of Colorado’s Tread Global, said in a release. “With guidance from the state’s Marijuana Enforcement Division and industry leaders who are investing in innovative designs, we are seeing new, extremely effective child-resistant packaging that still offers ease of access for adults.”

Tread Glocal designed the CR-Pak, a child-resistant tube customized to the size of the most common vape pens and cannabis products. Other companies have developed child-proof zipper bags designed for flower cannabis. One Florida manufacture makes spliff tubes and pop top canisters that are similar to those we see at California dispensaries, but with added child-resistant mechanisms.

“Because of the high quality, these packages are expected to roll over to the pharmaceutical industry in the next few years,” Buck predicted.