Market Street Overhaul Gets $15M Boost From Feds

The first phase would begin construction in 2020 before moving onto other public transit, pedestrian and cyclist improvements that includes banning most cars.

A rendering of the proposed future Market Street (Courtesy Better Market Street)

A years-in-the-making revamp of Market Street received a boost with a $15 million grant from the federal government on Tuesday.  

Funds from the U.S. Department of Transportation will go toward the first phase of Better Market Street, which is estimated to cost a total of $604 million. The project spans 2.2 miles of Market Street from Octavia Boulevard to the Embarcadero and has been in development since at least 2011.

The first phase covers roadway resurfacing, traffic signal upgrades, streetcar track replacement, and a new F-line turnaround loop at McAllister and Seventh streets. Improvements are under environmental review through 2019 and construction is set to begin in 2020.

Other planned improvements included colored transit-only lanes, larger boarding islands with ADA-accessible ramps, and updated transit shelters. Cyclists will be able to get around on a protect, sidewalk-level bike path while passing new public art and other furnishings.

Planners also proposed banning cars from 10th to Spear streets, save for public transit, taxis, commercial vehicles, and paratransit.

“It is a privilege to announce this new, transformative investment in San Francisco’s infrastructure, which will help deliver a modern, efficient transit system worthy of America’s cradle of innovation,” said San Francisco congressional Rep. Nancy Pelosi in a statement last week. “The Better Market Street Initiative will cut through the congestion and improve speed and capacity for millions of workers, students and families, while better protecting pedestrians and bicycles.”

Better Market Street brings together multiple city agencies but comments are can be directed to the Department of Public works by emailing bettermarketstreet@sfdpw.org. The next community working group meeting is scheduled for Jan. 28.

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