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Millennial Problems: Scary-Good - By - July 14, 2016 - SF Weekly
SF Weekly

Millennial Problems: Scary-Good

Gotta fool 'em all

As the saying goes: Fool the New York Post, shame on you, but fool The Atlantic, and now you’re famous.

The world’s scariest - or scary awesomest - millennial is a 26-year-old guy named Pablo Reyes who played the best trick of the week on a bunch of grownup children and journalists. We think his name is Pablo Reyes, but at this point the entire thing is open for debate.

It all started when some company released some video game for smartphones called Pokemon Go (we’d never heard of it either). Apparently it’s popular everywhere, including San Francisco. Eh, maybe popular isn’t the right word. It seems to be the biggest thing since sliced bread (that’s baby boomer humor). Think popular like the Super Bowl, early American Idol, or the pope. Pope popular. So the game is so popular that apparently people will believe anything having to do with the game.

“Pokemon Go: Major Highway Accident After Man Stops In Middle Of Highway To Catch Pikachu!”

“Pokemon GO: Teen Kills Younger Brother Because He Thought He Deleted His Pokemon”

“ISIS Is Taking Responsibility For “Pokemon Go”s Login Problems; Server Issues”

Those are some of the headlines on a fake news site called Cartel Press that apparently fit the narrative of Pokemon Go’s reception that reputable news organizations like the New York Post (hehehe) and Atlantic decided to run with them as if they were accurate. Pablo Reyes is the guy behind the guy who came up with them, according to this story from another reputable news source. (We’re so confused, we don’t know who to believe; maybe Pokemon isn’t even real?!)

Weirdly enough, Reyes claims the stories went viral by accident after he was testing some new platform for Cartel Press that pushed them to the top of the page. Whatever. The point is, many people just ate them up without the slightest pause, it seems. Just look at the photo of the “major highway accident.” It was clearly taken during winter.

“A lot of people go off the headline. They read the article. They find it funny. This is why it works. There are people who are very gullible out there,” Reyes told The Daily Beast. “I mean, if you actually read the article, you can tell the article is bogus.”

But no one seemed to care, which is nothing new. This story, for instance, does a good job of screwing with people, but it’s supposed to, like other social experiments.

Reyes is no stranger to screwing with gullible people. He’s also the guy who can predict the future with a few simple Facebook tricks.

Reyes’ stories were supposed to make people laugh, and instead the joke is wholly on them. He wins all the medals.