Public Health Officials Release Cautious Measles Advisory in S.F.

One case means it's a low risk to the public but unvaccinated people may have been exposed at the following locations.

(Courtesy photo)

San Francisco hardly has a measles outbreak emergency on its hand like New York City but there is a low risk to the public, health officials said Tuesday.

Last week, a Santa Clara resident spent a few days in San Francisco while contagious with measles. It’s the only known case but the San Francisco Department of Public Health is asking people without measles vaccinations to look for symptoms if they were in the same vicinity at the same time as the person largely on Caltrain. 

The days and times go as follows:

Monday, April 1
6:56 am – 8:13 am | Caltrain train 319 northbound. First car of train (car 116).
8:45 am – 9:15 am | Caltrain train 232 southbound. Last car of train (car 116).
8:15 – 9:45 am | SF Muni Bus #47
8:00 – 10:00 am | Hayes Valley Bakeworks at 525 Golden Gate Avenue
8:30 am – 7:00 pm | Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Ave

Tuesday, April 2
8:00 am – 7:30 pm | Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Ave
8:00 am – 9:30 am | Johnny Doughnuts at 392 Fulton St
8:00 – 10:00 am | Hayes Valley Bakeworks at 525 Golden Gate Avenue
6:30 – 8:00 pm | Double Decker Restaurant at 465 Grove St

Wednesday, April 3
8:00 – 10:00 am | Hayes Valley Bakeworks at 525 Golden Gate Avenue
8:30 am – 3:30 pm | Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Ave
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm | Caltrain station, 700 4th Street
3:34 pm – 5:10 pm | Caltrain train 258 southbound. Second car from the back (car 3861).
5:32 pm – 6:15 pm | Caltrain train 279 northbound. Second car from the front (car 3861).

Measle symptoms take between one to two weeks to appear, starting with tiny white spots that may appear inside the mouth. There are at least 465 cases of measles reported nationwide since January, including California. Public health officials are taking this case to remind people, especially those traveling internationally, to make sure they are up-to-date on vaccinations.

“Fortunately, most people in San Francisco have been vaccinated, but measles is still circulating in the world,” said Dr. Tomas Aragon, the city’s health officer. “It is highly infectious and can cause serious complications especially in infants, pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems.”

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