Get SF Weekly Newsletters
Pin It

Five Flights 

A new comedy in five parts from Adam Bock is alternately brilliant and thin

Wednesday, Feb 20 2002
Comments
Adam Bock's funny new play is broken into five parts, or "flights," like a Russian ballet -- Narrative, Vision, Mad Scene, Conclusion, and A Little Dance -- but most of the action takes place during the Narrative section, which is pretty Mad, and tells the story of a family disintegrating after the mother dies. The husband (and father) believes her soul has entered a little wren, and builds an aviary to protect it. When the wren dies, he goes, too, and his daughter wants to replace the aviary with a Church of the Fifth Day. (God created birds on the fifth day of Creation.) The church idea causes a family crisis, and the crisis drives the play. Bock's dialogue is spare and suggestive, but it's never quite clear what he's suggesting; he seems more interested in his bird-soul motif than in any of his characters. The four flights after Narrative also feel tacked-on, unnecessary. Still, the formal problems don't prevent Alexis Lezin from giving a manic performance as the church-founding daughter, Olivia, or Kevin Karrick from portraying a hilarious professional hockey player who likes bake sales and ballet. A scene with four of the characters at a ballet (Swan Lake) is also brilliant. Bock's first play, Swimming in the Shallows, had a successful local debut in 1999, and Five Flights has all of that play's formal inventiveness but not quite as much of its charm.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Popular Stories

  1. Most Popular Stories
  2. Stories You Missed