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Gag Order: Sex Workers Allege Mistreatment at Kink.com 

Wednesday, Feb 20 2013
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Acworth agreed with her views on combating shame, writing, "I grew up with an intense desire to be tied up and was very confused. It was only when I found porn that I started to come to terms with my sexuality. In my opinion, it is a very good thing for there to be as much diverse pornography out there as possible."

"I worry that people will use a criticism of Kink.com as ammunition in the war on sex," says Siouxsie Q, a sex worker, activist, and producer of This American Whore, a podcast about sex work that has been asked to change its name by the radio program This American Life. "When I was young and coming out as kinky, I watched Kink.com and thought, 'Whoa, that's close to my desire.' It was very validating to see that kind of porn out there."

When she first moved to the Bay Area, Bottoms says, "I was super excited to see this kinky hardcore company with a mission statement. People love the company and they do really awesome stuff. Removal of them would be detrimental to the local adult industry." She adds, "My hope has always been that unionization would extend to the sex industry," and says unionization might help models obtain ethical treatment from all porn companies, at all times.

Siouxsie Q defines ethical porn as sexual imagery in which "everyone involved feels justly compensated for their time and energy, every action both on and off camera is consensual, and the porn that is being documented captures some semblance of authentic desire."

Holloway puts it more bluntly: "It's really easy to make ethical pornography. To make unethical porn, you have to actively do something fucked up."

About The Author

Kate Conger

Bio:
Kate Conger has written for SF Weekly since 2011.

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