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July 21, 2009 Slideshows » Music

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The 10 Most Famous Musical Phone Numbers 

From New Edition�s �Mr. Telephone Man� to the Smiths� �Dial a Cliche,� the act of calling someone remains a strong theme in music spanning the sonic spectrum. Many artists have taken it a step further by including real and imaginary phone numbers in their tunes and confounding switchboard operators from coast to coast. Here are the most notable musical numbers, don�t lose �em. By Tamara Palmer.
867-5309 in 867-5309 (Jenny) by Tommy Tutone (1982)
This one-hit wonder reached number four, and angered a lot of people around the country who actually had this number and had to receive countless calls asking for Jenny.
1-800-MIX-A-LOT in Baby Got Back by Sir Mix-A-Lot (1992)
This fantasy hotline where girls can kick them nasty thoughts came courtesy of the Washington rapper with a fondness for booty.
606-0842 in 6060-842 by the B-52s (1979)
These interplanetary groovers dedicated a whole song to a wrong number on the groups debut album amidst hits like Planet Claire and Rock Lobster, but its still unclear why they put the dash where they did.
777-9311 in 777-9311 by the Time (1982)
Morris Day and his cohorts didnt hit as big with this song as they did with Jungle Love or even Oak Tree, but this phone number as chorus in a song written by Purple Rain nemesis Prince is still pretty infectious.
489-4608 in Diary by Alicia Keys (2005)
Keys actually mentions an old phone number she once had in New York during this autobiographical tune, but she says it so quick that it takes several repeated listens to decipher. She actually did set up a recorded voicemail for that number in the 347 area code.
(330) 281-8004 in Back Then by Mike Jones (2005)
Houston rapper Jones made himself known nationally by including his phone number in several of his songs and promotional materials. While this number no longer works, it inspired others in the music business to set up supposedly personal (ie. recorded voicemail) numbers for their fans to call.
911 in 911 is a Joke by Public Enemy (1989)
The legendary rap group barely softened the blow of their scathing criticism of American emergency services by having its wacky hypeman Flavor Flav deliver the words. It was later covered by Duran Duran.
(678) 999-8212 in Kiss Me Thru the Phone by Soulja Boy (2008)
Perhaps taking a cue from Mike Jones, Soulja Boy (known as a ringtone rapper for selling more than five million ringtones for cell phones) set up this actual phone number for his fans through the company Soundclick, and R&B singer Sammy slips it in several times during this song.
853-3937 in 853-3937 by Squeeze (1988)
Squeeze has practically disowned this song in the 21 years since its release. You wont find it on any greatest hits collection or in any concert set.
842-3089 in 842-3089 (Call My Name) by Etta James (1967)
Some 30-odd years before she was calling Beyonc out for her portrayal in the film Cadillac Records, Etta James was tossing out her (fake) phone number to her fans.
1/10
867-5309 in 867-5309 (Jenny) by Tommy Tutone (1982)
This one-hit wonder reached number four, and angered a lot of people around the country who actually had this number and had to receive countless calls asking for Jenny.
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