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The Kill Team: Absorbing Documentary About U.S. War Crimes in Afghanistan 

Tuesday, Jul 29 2014
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If it's true that ain't no man righteous, no not one, then it must be all the more difficult to be moral in the ethical quagmire of a pointless war, and Daniel Kraus' absorbing documentary The Kill Team demonstrates how badly trying to do the right thing can backfire. Adam Winfield was bright-eyed and bushy-tailed when he joined the Army in 2009, intending to fight the good fight in Afghanistan. Upon arriving, he discovered that not only was there not nearly as much adrenaline-pumpin' action as he'd been lead to believe — a fellow soldier descrbes hearing "Danger Zone" from Top Gun in his head during his first firefight — but that one of the ways the men in his unit dealt with the boredom while proving their testosterone levels was by killing unarmed Afghan civilians, then planting weapons on their bodies to make them look like terrorists. The Kill Team follows not only how Winfield's whistle-blowing on these atrocities (aided by the steadfast, heartbreaking support of his parents) resulted in one of the largest war crimes investigations in memory, but also how the Army hung Winfield out to dry. And along with the recent Afghanistan combat documentary Korengal, The Kill Team makes the flag-waving jingoism of Lone Survivor seem even more pandering.

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Sherilyn Connelly

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