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Monday, November 30, 2015

Kink.com Severs Ties With James Deen, Porn Star Accused of Sexual Assault

Posted By on Mon, Nov 30, 2015 at 11:56 AM

click to enlarge One of the assaults allegedly occurred at the Kink.com studio in San Francisco's Armory - MIKE KOOZMIN
  • Mike Koozmin
  • One of the assaults allegedly occurred at the Kink.com studio in San Francisco's Armory

UPDATE: San Francisco-based BDSM pornography studio Kink.com is severing all ties with James Deen, the popular porn star accused of sexual assault by several female porn performers in the past few days. Here's Kink's statement:
For the Kink.com community, as well as the larger BDSM community, consent and respect are sacrosanct. Effective immediately, Kink.com will cease all ties with James Deen, both as a performer and a producer.

Our performers deserve not only safe sets, but the ability to work without fear of assault. Rape or sexual assault, with or without a safe-word, off-set or on, should never be accepted as a hazard of adult production. While many of the allegations against Deen are new, the pattern is alarming. Over the coming weeks and months, we will review our Model Bill of Rights to strengthen rights of performers off-set, and work with the larger industry to help performers to have been assaulted to more easily come forward. 
According to a Kink.com spokesman, the company only learned of the alleged assault at its studio this morning. Our original story follows below. 

On any given day, a violent sex scene is playing out behind the foreboding brick facade of San Francisco's Armory building. That's the location of BDSM porn purveyor Kink.com, which specializes in bondage and fetish. 

Kink.com emphasizes that consent is fundamental to BDSM and that it upholds workplace standards that are "safe, sane, and consensual." 

But recent allegations from three porn performers accuse one of Kink.com's most popular male stars, James Deen, of decidedly non-consensual sexual assaults, including one incident at the Armory. 

On Saturday, porn performer and writer Stoya, Deen's ex-partner, accused him of rape on Twitter. 

Last night, another adult performer, Tori Lux, came forward with allegations that Deen "ruthlessly attacked and degraded" her at a "major porn studio" in June 2011. This morning, another performer, Ashley Fires, told the Daily Beast that Deen sexually assaulted her as she "was getting out of the shower of the communal bathroom at Kink." 

Both Lux and Fires have been frequent performers for Kink.com. 

click to enlarge James Deen - MATTEO CHINELLATO / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
  • Matteo Chinellato / Shutterstock.com
  • James Deen
Deen has responded to the allegations on Twitter, writing, "There have been some egregious claims made against me on social media. I want to assure my friends, fans and colleagues that these allegations are both false and defamatory. I respect women and I know and respect limits both professionally and privately."

On Sunday, women's website The Frisky announced that it would no longer publish Deen's sex advice column, What Would James Deen Do? and that it would remove all advertising to Deen's website. 

Frisky editor Amelia McDonell-Parry wrote of her decision to discontinue Deen's column: 
I asked him to do an advice column because I liked his directness and his confidence, but most of all, I liked his emphasis on communication, honesty and, most of all, CONSENT. That he has been accused of violating Stoya’s consent, that women I respect have since contacted me directly to say that they know of others to whom he has done the same thing? Well, I’m fucking heartsick over it. This makes it impossible for me to work with him any further, to give him a forum for giving advice that he is accused of not following himself. 

In her essay, Lux drew attention to the stigma attached to sex work and sex workers, writing: 
A few people with whom I’ve shared this story over the years have asked me why I didn’t call the police as soon as it happened, or publicly speak up about it shortly thereafter. The reason for that is because people—including the police—tend to believe that sex workers have placed themselves in harm’s way, and therefore can’t be assaulted. Of course, this claim couldn’t be further from the truth, as being involved in sex work does not equate to being harmed. Despite porn being a legal form of sex work, and it occurring in a controlled environment such as a porn set, this blame-the-victim mentality is still inherent in much of society. In turn, sex workers are silenced and our negative experiences are swept under the rug as we try to protect ourselves from the judgment of others—or worse, a variety of problems ranging from further physical attacks to professional issues such as slander and/or blacklisting.
We've reached out to Kink.com for their response to the allegation of sexual assault at the Armory and to ask whether they will continue to work with Deen. We will update this post if we receive a response. 
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About The Author

Julia Carrie Wong

Bio:
Julia Carrie Wong's work has appeared in numerous local and national titles including 48hills, Salon, In These Times, The Nation, and The New Yorker.

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