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Housing

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Berkeley Resident Offers to Rent Trunk of Car for $2,000

Posted By on Wed, Aug 27, 2014 at 8:34 AM

For rent! - FLICKR/SELBE B
If that walk-in closet you've been renting is starting to feel as thought you're living beyond your means, here's a chance to down grade and save some cash.  

A cynical someone posted this plausible ad to Craigslist, hoping to help "Twitterites" score affordable housing in the Bay Area on a Tech Bro's salary. According to the ad, it's a steal — you live in trunk of this car parked in the Tony Berkeley hills and in exchange you pay $2,000 and all parking tickets. 

It's clean and carpeted and on a nice night, it's the perfect dinner spot for two.

Check out the ad:

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Friday, August 15, 2014

Save Marty's Place: AIDS Residential Home Hopes to Reopen With Your Help

Posted By on Fri, Aug 15, 2014 at 2:47 PM

10533904_820429387989059_6242830900323300510_n.jpg
Marty's Place, a residential home for people with AIDS, has launched a fundraising drive, hoping to reopen as a co-op — and you and your checkbook are invited to the open house Monday.

Marty's Place was founded by Richard Purcell, a Franciscan friar, who came to San Francisco in 1989 to care for his brother Marty, who was dying of AIDS. Marty died eight weeks after his brother's arrival. Purcell, who passed away in 2011, decided to stay in San Francisco to care for people with AIDS.

In 1993, he acquired a Victorian mansion in the Mission. Naming the home after his late brother, Purcell opened Marty's Place, which served as a resource for AIDS victims for 18 years.

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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Here's How Long it Will Take You to Find an Apartment in San Francisco

Posted By on Tue, Apr 23, 2013 at 3:00 PM

Even if you're lucky enough to rent it, you'll still have to deal with city bureaucracy - RICHMONDSFBLOG.COM
  • Richmondsfblog.com
  • Even if you're lucky enough to rent it, you'll still have to deal with city bureaucracy

There's that one dreaded spot we've all experienced alike in San Francisco: an open house.

It's those Saturday mornings you spend next to 50 San Franciscans shoving past you with their credit reports and pay stubs, vying for the city's last 500-square-feet of squalid paradise.

It's as depressing as the housing market itself.

But we're here to point out that (very thin) silver lining to this dark reality. Lovely, the latest app in apartment hunting, has done some research, analyzing data from 80,000 rental listings to determine which neighborhoods you're most likely to score your next pad.

See Also: Teeny Tiny Tree House Shows How S.F. Can Get Creative With Housing

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Meet the Squatter Who Designed the Teeny Tiny Tree House in Golden Gate Park

Posted By on Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 7:30 AM

Rio, the teeny tiny landlord of the teeny tiny tree house - TONY POWELL/SF CHRONICLE
  • Tony Powell/SF Chronicle
  • Rio, the teeny tiny landlord of the teeny tiny tree house

We already know the landlord (the city) is a pain in the ass to deal with, but the squatters/designers of the charming teeny tiny tree house in Golden Gate Park have proven to be two pretty cool dudes.

In other words, we're guessing they'd throw some chill teeny tiny parties.

We're delighted to introduce readers to the 47-year-old Tony Powell who talked to the Chron this week, giving the paper, and thus the world, a little history on that little door that's made Golden Gate Park all that more desirable. Powell, who lives on a sailboat in the bay, explained that he and his 6-year-old son, Rio, took a trip to Golden Gate Park in December where they had a "special feeling" about one of the trees lining the concourse outside the de Young.

See Also:

Teeny Tiny Tree House Door Replaced With Crappier Teeny Tiny Tree House Door

Teeny Tiny Hoarder Lives in Golden Gate Park's Teeny Tiny Tree House

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Friday, April 5, 2013

Teeny Tiny Tree House Door Replaced With Crappier Teeny Tiny Tree House Door

Posted By on Fri, Apr 5, 2013 at 8:35 AM

It's one frustration after another when dealing with the city.

After flustering the masses by removing the adorable tree house door from Golden Gate Park, city officials promised they'd replace it, and replace it they did. As richmondsfblog.com astutely noted, the city screwed in an untreated imitation door that'll almost certainly lower property values.

This is bullshit - RICHMONDSFBLOG.COM
  • Richmondsfblog.com
  • This is bullshit

See Also: Teeny Tiny Hoarder Lives in Golden Gate Park's Teeny Tiny Tree House

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Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Teeny Tiny Tree House Back by Popular Demand

Posted By on Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Naturally, it was city bureaucracy that resulted in the sad and abrupt departure of the beloved teeny tiny tree house in Golden Gate Park.

According to ABC, it was the rigid folks over a the Recreation and Parks Department who removed the small door hinged to a tree in the park; city leaders claimed the miniature mouse pad had "damaged the tree."

But alas, Democracy rules -- and city leaders claim they will return the adorable door to appease the people of San Francisco.

What a head trip this has been - RICHMONDSFBLOG.COM
  • Richmondsfblog.com
  • What a head trip this has been

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Thursday, March 28, 2013

Teeny Tiny Hoarder Lives in Golden Gate Park's Teeny Tiny Tree House

Posted By on Thu, Mar 28, 2013 at 8:50 AM

Readers have been amused (as were we) by the extra small, possibly rent-controlled, tree house in Golden Gate Park. So who's living behind this mystery door, you ask? A compulsive hoarder, that's who.

Richmondsfblog.com revealed some disturbing images of what life is like inside this teeny tiny tree house:

Hoarding is a real-life struggle - RICHMONDSFBLOG.COM
  • Richmondsfblog.com
  • Hoarding is a real-life struggle

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Tuesday, March 26, 2013

San Francisco's Housing Stats Confound Even the Best of Minds

Posted By on Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 3:00 PM

A nice place to live...
  • A nice place to live...

Earlier today, we ran an article about the GOP harnessing the seemingly limitless hatred of Nancy Pelosi within its membership to turn the occasion of the House minority leader's 73rd birthday into a "RETIRE NANCY" fund-raising bash.

Slate's Matthew Yglesias was puzzled by Republicans' visceral hatred of all things San Francisco, stating the only problem with San Francisco is that that "there's not enough San Francisco."

Cavalcades of people should be moving here, he continues, "But in fact total population growth in the San Francisco and San Jose metro areas has been rather slow, since for people to move there we'd have to build more houses. Zoning and other permitting restrictions have tended to make that quite difficult" -- thus jacking up housing prices.

That makes a lot of sense. But, counter-intuitively, it's not entirely true.

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Thursday, March 21, 2013

City Rules "Remodeling" 850-Square-Foot House to 5,139 Square Feet Is A-Okay

Posted By on Thu, Mar 21, 2013 at 10:35 AM

The current structure at 125 Crown Terrace, in yellow, and the plan for a "remodeled" home seven times its size - ANDREW J. NILSEN
  • Andrew J. Nilsen
  • The current structure at 125 Crown Terrace, in yellow, and the plan for a "remodeled" home seven times its size

Readers may recall a December SF Weekly article about the surreal city rules builders exploit to blow up small homes into mansions, and blow away what's left of San Francisco's dwindling affordable housing stock.

That article turned out to be Exhibit 17 in a hearing last night at the Board of Appeals.

At issue was a central example cited in our December article: a home at 125 Crown Terrace owned by developer, former Building Inspection Commission president, and Port Commissioner to-be Mel Murphy. He hopes to "remodel" it from 854-square feet to 5,139 square feet; previously, Murphy had been denied a demolition permit when he only hoped to expand to 4,019 square feet.

The complaint, pushed by Murphy's next-door neighbor Ramona Albright, involved gripes about blocked views and felled trees of the sort you'd expect in an upscale enclave like Twin Peaks. But it also brought into question the city's reading of a statute that allows savvy builders to demolish the very elements of a building they retained to avoid being classified as a demolition.

See Also: Bringing Down the Housing: How Builders Game the System

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Monday, March 11, 2013

Surprise, Surprise! S.F.'s Rental Market Is Twice as Expensive As the National Average

Posted By on Mon, Mar 11, 2013 at 4:30 PM

That beauty doesn't come cheap.
  • That beauty doesn't come cheap.

Anyone who has searched for an apartment in San Francisco could appreciate the proverb "A drowning man will clutch at a straw." The process sucks. Open houses draw dozens of competitors, some who eagerly inform the landlord that they're willing to pay $200 more in rent and hand over the first-months check right now. And then come the rejections. Application, denial. Application, denial. And so on.

Eventually, the search is no longer about finding the right apartment; it's just about finding an apartment. Consumed by a growing sense of hopelessness, the apartment hunter craves for the day the search ends. By the time it does, he is so eager to sign a lease that the city's sky-high rental rates -- $1,400 for a Tenderloin studio, $4,000 for a Potrero Hill two-bedroom -- barely register. And that sentiment pretty much carries San Francisco's renters through the first of each month, as we sign bank account-denting checks with just-happy-to-be-here smiles.

For many of those residents, making rent means making sacrifices -- the price to pay to live in San Francisco. According to a new study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, San Francisco's rental market is nearly twice as expensive as the national average.

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