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Wednesday Nine: Progressive Dems Gather at Juanita MORE! - By pkane - September 14, 2016 - SF Weekly
SF Weekly

Wednesday Nine: Progressive Dems Gather at Juanita MORE!

Gambas al ajillo at La Marcha in Berkeley (Peter Lawrence Kane)

 

Plus Kokio Republic will launch The Brim, Elixir hosts a Whiskeyfest, and Big Alcohol tries to ward off legal pot.

The Lunchpad Rolls Out a Boozy Weekend Brunch

Adam and Mark Hubbell and Chris Snowden, the two brothers and the third brother-from-another-mother who run Hayes Valley’s three-year-old The Lunchpad inside Noir Lounge (581 Hayes) during the late morning and early afternoon hours, will begin a brunch menu this month. Apart from the usual huevos rancheros, there are green eggs and ham, an Alaskan Thunder sandwich made with sockeye salmon and herbed cream cheese on pain de mie, and a “Brunchpad Bloody” adorned with habanero candied bacon and homemade pickles.

Meet Progressive S.F. Candidates at Juanita MORE!’s Happy Hour

If you’ve never been to drag queen Juanita MORE!‘s happy hour at the Starlight Room (atop the Sir Francis Drake Hotel) on Wednesdays, you are missing a truly wonderful cocktail party with a terrific atmosphere. And on Sept. 28, from 6-10 p.m., you can chat, martini in hand, with progressive candidates for city and local office, such as Supervisors Andrew Peskin and Jane Kim (who’s running for State Senate), Hillary Ronen, Sandra Lee Fewer, Tom Temprano, Bevan Dufty, David Campos, and more.

Kokio Republic to Open The Brim

Looks like Aria might get some competition. Fans of Korean fried chicken, aka the best fried chicken, will be elated to learn that food truck Kokio Republic is set to open a fast-casual spot in the Tenderloin. Eater reports that The Brim (711 Geary) will be a chicken-and-local-beer spot with 30-35 seats, with an tentative opening date of January.

Bon Marché Might Become Another Version of The Market

SFist spoke to Matt Semmelhack, of the recently closed Bon Marché (1355 Market) which may pivot into a lunch-centric spot like The Market, just across the hall. “We’re working on filling the space with several smaller food vendors,” he said. Eater reports that, although the identities of those vendors are as yet unknown, they may move in as soon as Monday, Sept. 19.

Whiskeyfest Hits Elixir Sept. 22

Well-regarded (and very old) whiskey bar Elixir (3200 16th St.) will host a Whiskeyfest on Wednesday, Sept. 21 from 4 p.m. until closing, featuring guest whiskey-tenders and plenty of $5 shots and drinks.

Valencia & Kebab, Buttons Candy Bar Close

SFist caught that Valencia & Kebab (525 Valencia) has shuttered after only 10 months, while Hoodline reports that three-year-old Noe Valley candy store Buttons (4027 24th St.) has also thrown in the towel. Making rent on 24th Street by selling $3 chocolate bars was probably quite difficult, and Buttons started cohabiting with a video store called Video Wave last year. And Video Wave isn’t going anywhere.

Dry Pot Restaurant Celestial Flame Opens in the Richmond

Dry pot (xiang guo), a variation on hot pot, is apparently a big trend in China at the moment. It’s basically hot pot minus the water, and Hoodline reports that it’s popping up on (you guessed it) Clement Street in the form of Celestial Flame (1115 Clement). $10 gets you one of five preparations, at four levels of spiciness.

Fifty Years of the Sugar Industry Blaming Everything on Fat

NPR lays bare how the sugar industry has used junk science, specious claims, and research that didn’t disclose that the sugar producers’ lobby was funding it to deter an emerging consensus that sugar is bad for you: “One study that found a health benefit when people ate less sugar and more vegetables was dismissed because that dietary change was not feasible.”

Guess Who’s Fighting Cannabis Legalization

It’s not some organization called Evangelical Moms Against Teenage Popularity. It’s the booze lobby. The Intercept reports that beer and spirit companies are putting big money into defeating a legalization measure in Massachusetts (although it does note that “The alcohol industry is nowhere near unified over pot policy, however, with several craft brewing firm welcoming laws that relax restrictions over pot.”)