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This week: Rayven Justice, Kehlani, and Clyde Carson

If you like Jeremih,
then you’ll like Rayven Justice

In 2009, Jeremih emerged on the music scene with his playful, staccato ditty “Birthday Sex,” ushering in a new wave of contemporary R&B that pairs hip-hop beats with ultra-sexy lyrics. Four years later, Oakland crooner Rayven Justice followed in Jeremih’s footsteps, unleashing “Slide Thru,” a piano-laced anthem that would catapult him into the spotlight and garner remixes from the likes of Migos and Waka Flocka Flame.

With only a three-year age difference between them, the two singers possess similar, silky, coaxing voices and a penchant for singing about love and, more to the point, sex. While their music is rooted in R&B, these smooth-operating ladies’ men also bring pop, hip-hop, and electronic music sensibilities to their craft, and have a knack for coining catchy hooks and propulsive bangers that work equally well in the club or the bedroom.

 

Album Spotlight:
SweetSexySavage
— Kehlani

Oakland singer Kehlani Parrish has been making music since 2009 — first as the lead vocalist of a pop group called PopLyfe, then as a solo artist, putting out two mixtapes. Now signed to Atlantic Records, it makes sense that the R&B/pop singer would go hard for her debut album, SweetSexySavage, which came out at the end of January.

The 19-track record runs the gamut of human emotions, combining love songs with elegiac numbers, wherein the 21-year-old singer holds nothing back, speaking candidly about depression, breakups, suicide temptations, and unattractive character traits. There are no featured artists on the project, which is always a smart move with debuts because it gives listeners a strong sense of the musician’s own talents. And while Kehlani’s voice is not one you’d call powerful, it is acerbic and flexible, and she delivers each line with such force that the music reverberates long after listening.

 

SF Weekly Song of the Week:

“She Ready” —  Clyde Carson, feat. E-40

“Deep, rumbling bass serves as the backbone for this ominous yet upbeat ratchet rap song, and E-40’s rubbery voice makes it that much better.”

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